Italian film showing on Monday 10th December – Divorzio all’italiana – Divorce Italian Style

Italian flagWe are pleased to invite you to the next film of our Italy through its films series, featuring Divorzio all’italiana – Divorce Italian Style (Pietro Germi, 1961).

Join us on Monday 10th December, in Lecture Theatre B at Avenue Campus at 6:15pm. The film looks at the “persistence of antiquated and stubborn moral and social codes (the honour of the Latin male) in the face of situations in which they have become hopelessly outdated: Don Ferdinando Cefalù cannot stand his wife but instead of demanding the modernisation of local custom and of the law (divorce was only legalized in Italy in the 1970s) he prefers to adopt a hypocritical respect for tradition (legislation on crimes of passion goes back to the Fascist era and was not repealed until the 1980s) and settle with the status quo. The all’italiana of the title, therefore, refers to the co-presence of backwardness and modernity, each of which are exploited by the characters when it suits them.” (From: Directory of World Cinema: Italy, edited by Louis Bayman, Intellect Books Ltd, 2012. ProQuest Ebook Central,
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/soton-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1057951.

There is also a critique of the film by Elena Gipponi.

Pre-screening introduction and post-showing discussion in English, all welcome, free entry.

Next CLLEAR seminar: The political economy of language education research (or the lack thereof): Nancy Fraser and the case of translanguaging

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Monday 10th December 2018 at 5pm in Room 3031, Building 7, Highfield Campus. Please note the change of day and time from usual. The talk is entitled “The political economy of language education research (or the lack thereof): Nancy Fraser and the case of translanguaging” and will be delivered by David Block Allen, ICREA Professor in Sociolinguistics from the Departament d’Anglès i Lingüística, Universitat de Lleida – Catalonia, Spain. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
This paper problematises the politics of language education research with regard to social injustice, which is not only cultural, but also material. Its starting position is that most language education research today is, following Nancy Fraser, recognition-oriented, in that it takes on culture and identity-based injustices such as racism, gender bias, religious bias and LGBTQ-phobia. It does not, however, have much to say about more economic and class-based injustices – redistribution issues – and it does not draw on the political economy literature essential to any attempt to explore such issues. The paper develops these arguments and then applies them to a specific area of language education research which has become popular in recent years, translanguaging. It concludes that while translanguaging research may deal with recognition issues, in particular ethnolinguistic racism, it is not likely to alter in any way the underlying the current capitalist order which is causing deep and profound damage to the social fabric of societies worldwide and surely is the most likely cause of the poverty in which many translanguagers live. Language education research thus needs to work at the level of recognition, as it already does, while also taking on redistribution issues.

CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 5th December: From English language learners to Intercultural Citizens: Chinese student sojourners development of intercultural citizenship in ELT and EMI programmes

CGEThe next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 5th December 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Will Baker from the Centre for Global Englishes at the University of Southampton and is entitled “From English language learners to Intercultural Citizens: Chinese student sojourners development of intercultural citizenship in ELT and EMI programmes”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The notion of global or intercultural citizenship has become prominent in international higher education and EMI (English medium instruction). The goal is to educate students for successful interaction in intercultural situations across multiple communities from the local to the global. However, most discussions are at the theoretical level and there is insufficient empirical evidence documenting the extent to which experiences of students in international universities actually leads to the development of intercultural citizenship. To address this gap this research explored Chinese students’ (the largest group of international students in the UK and a major group of ELT learners) experiences before, during and after study-abroad (SA). Data was collected from students (n = 253) via questionnaires, interviews and a focus group in the UK and China. Findings demonstrated generally positive attitudes towards intercultural citizenship and intercultural citizenship education. Furthermore, many participants reported developing an increased sense of identification with intercultural citizenship as a result of SA. However, understanding of intercultural citizenship was often superficial and no students reported any formal intercultural citizenship education either in preparation for SA or during their time in the UK. Moreover, a number of students either rejected or withdrew from the idea of developing an intercultural identity due to negative impressions of intercultural experiences. We argue that these mixed findings are unsurprising given the lack of opportunities to prepare for or reflect on intercultural experiences. Furthermore, the absence of intercultural citizenship education is a missed opportunity in ELT and EAP provision.

Italian film showing this evening – I soliti ignoti – Persons unknown

Italian flagWe are pleased to invite you to the next film of our Italy through its films series, featuring I soliti ignoti – Persons unknown.

Join us on Monday 26th November, in Lecture Theatre B at Avenue Campus at 6:15pm as we move on from the socially committed cinema of neorealism, to the satirical, cynical world of “commedia all’ italiana” with a trilogy of screenings starting with I soliti ignoti – Persons unknown (Mario Monicelli, 1958), a wonderful ensemble comedy about a group of hopeless thieves, with Totò, Marcello Mastroianni, Vittorio Gassman, and the first performance of Claudia Cardinale. An unsurpassed vision of an Italy moving towards the economic miracle.

Parodying the perennial traits of an Italy that has only partially succeeded in adjusting to the habits and lifestyles of post-war modernity, these type of comedies have lost none of their bite, nor their warm amusement at the petty foibles underlying society’s pretensions.

Pre-screening introduction and post-showing discussion in English, all welcome, free entry.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 21st November from 3-4pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?’ All staff and students are welcome!

The seminar is entitled Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations? Here is the abstract for the seminar:
Contemporary Eastern Europe is currently, once more, one of the spaces for the rise of far right, fascist agendas, as much as increasingly dominated by the rule of heteronormatively imagined futures. To an extent, the “region” holds a shared socialist history of gender inequality and in places like Romania, long histories of slavery and domination over Roma populations. In this contemporaneity that hardly feels shared, where does a decolonial project need to start from? What kind of “whiteness” are we talking about when talking about Eastern European, former socialist subjects? Why are intersectional issues of race, gender and sexuality historically enmeshed but also often invisible from critical contemporary evaluations of the aesthetics and politics of the “region”? I propose to turn to a specific historicalcontextual moment of the Non-Aligned Movement as a point of departure in this analysis to ask what type of imagination and what forms of futurity were projected from socialist Eastern Europe onto some of the late colonial, soon to be independent countries in Africa.

The seminar will be led by Dr Mihaela Brebenel, Lecturer in Digital Media Culture at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Mihaela is interested in screen studies, film theory, media archaeology, aesthetic theory, the politics of the audiovisual, feminist practices with moving images, the cultural production of subjectivity in contemporary technologically-mediated contexts, historiographies and critical uses of archival images in academic and artistic practice. She also reflects in her work on gender, performance and interventions exploring the private and public configurations of media, space, memory, and the possibilities of collective work.

We have arranged for the event to finish on time for colleagues who wish to attend the Advanced Research in Arts and Humanities seminar at 4pm, and the event is held in the same building.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 7th November: English Medium Instruction in Japan: Macro-level policies and micro-level practices at the nexus of language and content learning

CGEThe next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th November 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Heath Rose from the University of Oxford and is entitled “English Medium Instruction in Japan: Macro-level policies and micro-level practices at the nexus of language and content learning”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Internationalisation and English in the twenty-first century are inextricably intertwined, as universities turn to Englishisation in order to internationalise (Kirkpatrick, 2011). A side effect of internationalisation is the rapid emergence of English medium instruction (EMI) in higher education around the world, defined as ‘the use of the English language to teach academic subjects (other than English itself) in countries or jurisdictions where the first language (L1) of the majority of the population is not English’ (Macaro, 2018, p. 19). Wilkinson (2013, p. 3) notes that EMI programmes have become ‘commonplace in many institutes of higher education’, and Japan is noted to be an area of recent significant growth (see Galloway et al., 2017). This talk explores the language-related implications associated with policy and practice in EMI in Japan. It first takes a macro-level policy-perspective to explore the English-language implications of recent trends in Japanese HE (see Rose & McKinley, 2018). This is then followed by a micro-level practice-perspective exploring the relationships between proficiency, language-related challenges, motivation, and content learning outcomes, which are drawn from questionnaire, interviews, proficiency test, and content score datasets of more than 500 students in EMI contexts in Japan. Controlling for motivation, results revealed a strong interaction between proficiency and language-related challenges, as well as proficiency and success measures in EMI (in terms of course grades). An exploration of lexical range in EMI lectures also suggests a vocabulary threshold needed for students to understand some content subjects, and also points to the importance of subject-specific ESP courses. The study, therefore, equips English teachers with targeted areas of focus in order to best support students in EMI contexts, so they can be successful in their studies.

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. His research interests are in EMI, Global Englishes and TESOL. His books include Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Rose & Galloway, 2019), Doing Research in Applied Linguistics (McKinley & Rose, 2017), The Japanese Writing System (Rose, 2017), and Introducing Global Englishes (Galloway & Rose, 2015).

Italian film showing this evening – Bicycle Thieves – Ladri di biciclette

Italian flagWe are pleased to invite you to the next film of our Italy through its films series, featuring Bicycle Thieves – Ladri di biciclette.

We will be meeting in Lecture Theatre B at Avenue Campus at 6:15pm on Monday 29th October. All welcome! A brief description of the film by Adam Bingham states: “The film traces a voyage through Italy whose implicit postscript is that tomorrow and the next day ad infinitum the same camera could film the same streets and record similar stories featuring all-too similar people in identical situations; and in this at least, Ladri di biciclette is paradigmatic neorealism.” (Directory of World Cinema: Italy, edited by Louis Bayman, Intellect Books Ltd, 2012. ProQuest Ebook Central,
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/soton-ebooks/detail.action?docID=1057951)

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity

TNSThe Centre for Transnational Studies, in collaboration with the Centre for Imperial and Postcolonial Studies, is hosting its first event of the academic year on Wednesday 31st October from 3-4:30pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity’. All staff and students are welcome!

The event is a postgraduate and early career masterclass run by Dr Maria Tomlinson, a postdoctoral research associate on the project ‘FemmepowermentNiger’ based in the Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield. The idea with these masterclasses is for students (PGT and PGR) and interested staff to get an introduction to potential new ways of approaching their work, and for students to have a chance to talk to someone a few years further on in the postgrad and academic career journey. Dr Tomlinson was one of the first cohort of AHRC SWW DTP students, and completed her PhD in French between the Universities of Bristol and Reading earlier this year. She also set up one of the first SWW DTP research clusters on gender and sexuality.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

The 2019 eLearning Symposium – call for papers extended!

eLearning Symposium 2019
The Call for Papers for the 2019 eLearning Symposium has been extended! The new deadline will be 31st October 2018, with presenters to be notified of acceptance by 15th November.

For more information about this event, which will run on Friday 25th January 2019, please see the eLearning Symposium website and the eLearning Symposium Twitter account.

Next CLLEAR seminar: Grammatical innovations in Multicultural London English

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 24th October 2018 at 4:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Grammatical innovations in Multicultural London English” and will be delivered by David Thomas Hall from Queen Mary, University of London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Recent years have seen growing interest in interdisciplinary research at the intersection of sociolinguistics and formal linguistic theory, sometimes called Sociosyntax (see e.g., Cornips and Corrigan 2005; Lingua special issue on formalising syntactic variation (2010), vol 120.5). Recent research into urban multiethnolects in the UK (e.g., Cheshire et al 2011) has revealed unexpected syntactic properties in emerging varieties of English, particularly Multicultural London English (MLE). Research on MLE has so far been carried out in a variationist sociolinguistic framework (Cheshire et al 2011 a.o), but here I report on my research into grammatical innovations in MLE in a broadly generative framework. I focus on the new pronoun man and preposition+definite article drop (P-D-drop). I will present analyses for the two phenomena, and discuss how the study of grammatical variation picked up through sociolinguistic research can inform our understanding of the limits of the language faculty from a minimalist perspective.