Monthly Archives: May 2017

Make the most of Early Bird registration for EUROCALL!

EuroCALL

Early Bird registration for EUROCALL closes on Friday 2nd June! The University of Southampton is delighted to be hosting the 25th EUROCALL conference at Highfield Campus from 23rd-26th August 2017. To register, please follow the instructions on the EUROCALL 2017 website.

The theme of EUROCALL 2017 is ‘CALL in a Climate of Change: Adapting to Turbulent Global Conditions.’ This theme encompasses the notion of how Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) responds to changing global circumstances (in economic, political or environmental spheres), which impact on education. The theme cuts across areas including teacher training, competitive education models, open education, blended learning models, collaboration, creative and innovative pedagogy, student engagement, student’s needs and sustainability. The EUROCALL 2017 conference will discuss and discover insights into how the theories and practices of CALL are driving, responding to and facilitating change in the world around us.

Join us to share your real-world experiences of CALL research and teaching and join our vibrant community of practitioners.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 25th May 2017 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable” and will be delivered by Jennifer Smith from the University of Glasgow and Sophie Holmes-Elliott the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion! Read more…

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Free intensive Chinese courses for students and staff

The Confucius Institute at the University of Southampton is offering two free short intensive Chinese courses for University students and staff, taking place from 5-9 June and from 12-16 June from 7:00-8:30pm. Please email ll2c15@soton.ac.uk for further information or to register for one of these courses.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” – SEMINAR CANCELLED

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 17th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” and will be delivered by Professor Alessandro Benati from the University of Greenwich. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The present study explores the effects of structured input and structured output when delivered in isolation or in combination on the acquisition of the English causative. Research investigating the effects of processing instruction and meaning output-based instruction has provided some interesting and sometimes conflicting results. Additionally, there are a number of issues (e.g., measuring a combination of structured input and structured output, measuring discourse-level effects) that have not been fully and clearly addressed. To provide answers to the questions formulated in this study, two classroom experiments were carried out. In the first study, fifty-four Chinese university students (age 18-20) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to four groups: structured input only group (n=13); structured output only group (n=15); combined structured input and structured output group (n=16); control group (n=10). In the second study, thirty school-age Greek learners (age 10-12) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups: structured input only group (n=10); structured output only group (n=10); combined structured input and structured output group (n=10).

Only subjects who participated in all phases of each experiment and scored lower than 60% in the pre-tests were included in the final data collection. Instruction lasted for three hours. The control group received no instruction on the causative structure. Interpretation and production tasks were used in a pre-test and post-test design. The design included a delayed post-test battery (3 weeks after instruction) for both experiments. In the first study, the assessment tasks included an interpretation and production task at sentence-level, and an interpretation task at discourse-level. In the second study, an additional discourse-level production task was adopted along with the interpretation discourse-level task. The results indicated that learners who received structured input both in isolation and in combination benefitted more than learners receiving structured output only. These two groups were able to retain instructional gains three weeks later in all assessment measures.

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Top 10 position for Linguistics in 2018 Complete University Guide

Linguistics at Southampton has been ranked in the top ten (of 38 institutions) in the 2018 Complete University Guide. The breakdown of scores shows a successful balance between very high research quality with excellent student satisfaction.

For further information about the ranking, visit the Complete University Guide website.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Friday 5th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees” and will be delivered by Dr Neal Snape, Gunma Prefectural Women’s University and Chuo University in Japan. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous L2 studies by Shirahata (1995) and Tomiyama (2000) examined L1 Japanese L2 English child returnees suppliance of articles and a range of grammatical morphemes. Shirahata focused on age-related L2 acquisition while Tomiyama was concerned with L2 attrition. Both studies found omission in obligatory contexts, though little evidence of L2 attrition. We adopt a neutral position for our study as both acquisition and attrition are likely to be taking place in heritage language reversal cases. This study examines datasets from two L1 Japanese L2 English speakers. The sibling child returnees were born in Japan and lived 8 years in the U.S. before returning to Japan. The younger child (KS) was exposed to L2 English from 3 years of age and the older child (CS) was first exposed from 12 years of age. Background questionnaires revealed that they have high levels of proficiency in English, based on the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) scores. ‘The Frog Story’ (Mayer, 1979) was administered and the returnees’ narrations were recorded and transcribed. The two participants were compared on their article suppliance to address the following two research questions:
RQ1: Does reduced input limit success in acquisition or lead to attrition over time?
RQ2: Are there any differences between the returnees given the difference in age of acquisition?

Voice Onset Time
This longitudinal study examines whether the decline in exposure to L2 input experienced by YS produces changes in voice onset time (VOT). YS met with researchers six times over the span of six years. Each meeting required YS to complete ‘The Frog Story’ and a picture description task (Goad & White, 2008) to elicit spoken production. Each time YS was recorded using a video camera and an iPod. The recordings of each session were subsequently analyzed in Praat for production of words beginning with voiceless consonants /p/, /t/ and /k/. Once located in the recordings, words were cut out of the original full-length recordings so that a more detailed analysis of VOT could be conducted. The results of the analyses for all recordings (across six years) shows that YS’s L1 Japanese VOT values and L2 English VOT values are different in length and that there is no evidence of change or attrition in her VOT values for /p/, /t/ and /k/ in L2 English.

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