Next CLLEAR seminar: Examining multilingualism in adulthood: the initial stages and beyond – Wednesday 13th November

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 13th November 2019 at 5pm in Lecture Theatre B, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The talk is entitled “Examining multilingualism in adulthood: the initial stages and beyond” and will be delivered by Eloi Puig-Mayenco from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

The exact shape, timing and extent of linguistic transfer in additive multilingualism have been the subject of much research during the past 15 years and yet, there is no conclusive evidence of what factors delimit the selection of transfer in L3/Ln acquisition. To date, not much research has moved beyond the initial stages and attempted to model the cognitive processes involved in subsequent development and ultimate attainment of an L3. In this talk, I will present the main theories that model transfer selection in L3/Ln acquisition, as well as examine two datasets tapping into the initial stages and further development of L3/Ln acquisition. The first dataset illustrates the L3 initial stages and developmental trajectories in a longitudinal design. These data will be discussed in light of the theories of morphosyntactic transfer selection and provide new insights into the study of developmental trajectories. The second dataset will be used to illustrate how a highly advanced L3 might play a role in the grammatical restructuring of previously acquired languages (i.e., the L1 and the L2). The results suggest (a) that an L2 is, in fact, more vulnerable than the L1 to regressive transfer effects as argued by the Differential Stability Hypothesis (Cabrelli Amaro, 2017); and (b) that the influence of the L3 on the L2 is enhanced when the property in the L1 and the L3 share the same morphosyntactic representation. The overall picture suggests that the field is ready to start to chart L3/Ln acquisition beyond the initial stages.

MLL/MeXsu Seminar on 6th November 2019

A Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL) / Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) seminar will take place on Wednesday 6th November 2019 from 17:00-18:40 in Building 65 Room 1177 at Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled “Producing Latinx identities in the census: A comparative analysis of ethnoracial and linguistic classification” …

CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 30th October: Global Englishes and transcultural communication: implications for theory and practice in ELT

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 30th October 2019 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre B (room 1201), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Will Baker from the Centre for Global Englishes, Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University …

Next CLLEAR seminar: Sustainability of Exploratory Practice: A case study of former ELT pre-service teachers

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 24th October 2019 at 5pm in Lecture Theatre A, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The talk is entitled “Sustainability of Exploratory Practice: A case study of former ELT pre-service teachers” and will be …

SIGLTA meeting on Thursday 23rd May: Artificial Intelligence (AI) – Changing the Face of Formative and Summative Assessment

You are cordially invited to attend the Special Interest Group in Language Testing and Assessment (SIGLTA) meeting. SIGLTA is a postgraduate student-led reading/research group within the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. The meeting is at 17:00-18:30 on Thursday 23/05/2019 in room 1173, Avenue Campus (building 65), and will be …

Next CLLEAR talk: Findings from GECO: The Ghent Eye-tracking Corpus of Monolinguals and Bilinguals Reading an Entire Novel

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) talk will take place on Wednesday 22nd May 2019 at 4:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The talk is entitled “Findings from GECO: The Ghent Eye-tracking Corpus of Monolinguals and Bilinguals Reading an Entire Novel” …

InnoConf19 on 28th June: Treasuring languages: innovative and creative approaches in HE

It is with great pleasure that Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton are hosting the 9th annual conference in the Innovative Language Teaching and Learning at University series, InnoConf19, this year. The conference will take place on Friday 28th June 2019. We are delighted to have …

LCAWB talk tomorrow: DeCentring the intercultural and small culture formation on the go – implications for internationalisation, research methods and who we all are.

Language & Culture in the Academic World & Beyond logo
As part of the Language & Culture in the Academic World & Beyond being run by PGR students in Modern Languages and Linguistics, there will be a talk by Professor Adrian Holliday from Canterbury Christ Church University on Friday 10th May 2019 at 4pm in Lecture Theatre B, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The talk is entitled “DeCentring the intercultural and small culture formation on the go – implications for internationalisation, research methods and who we all are.” All welcome – please register for the talk here!

Here is the abstract for the talk:
So much of what has become normalised regarding the intercultural now seems invalidated by Centre structures (e.g. associated with ‘the West’, native-speakerism, the neoliberal university, patriarchy, and methodological nationalism). This includes common large-culture concepts such as equating second language with second culture, quantifying intercultural competence, locating third spaces as between, interpreting integration as mixing with locals. The struggle to deCentre requires finding threads that dissolve assumed boundaries and are often not where we expect, beginning with transient and everyday small culture formation on the go. However, things are often not what they seem. The intercultural is everywhere; interculturality is messy and political; researchers and the researched merge; and data needs to be disturbed. I will attempt to look at these questions through reference to my forthcoming book with Sara Amadasi, Making sense of the intercultural: finding deCentred threads.

Next CLLEAR seminar: A dynamic typology of syntactic change in contact Englishes

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th May 2019 at 4pm in Lecture Theatre C, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The talk is entitled “A dynamic typology of syntactic change in contact Englishes” and will be delivered by Devyani Sharma from Queen Mary, University of London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Postcolonial Englishes are an ideal testing ground for the influence of universals and language transfer in contact languages. However, the tendency to conduct static comparisons of contributing grammars to an outcome grammar often overlooks a dynamic aspect of the actuation problem, namely ‘why certain instances of variation become changes and others don’t’ (McMahon 1994). I assess this question in relation to contact settings: Why does only a subset of variable usage become entrenched over time in a given contact variety? An initial comparison of several syntactic features in Indian English and Singapore English supports a strong substrate, rather than universalist, basis for new usage. However, a closer examination shows that only some of these variable features have stabilised and become deeply embedded across the community. Substrates cannot fully account for this subtler distribution. They over-predict change. To better understand which forms become more entrenched, I turn to a sociohistorical hallmark of postcolonial Englishes: diminishing input from the source variety. Drawing on models of input sensitivity from second language acquisition theory (the Subset Principle; the Interface Hypothesis), I develop a two-dimensional typology to assess the relative role of substrate difference and input demand (the degree to which rich input is needed for the acquisition of a specific syntactic form) in stable outcomes in New Englishes. Both appear to be operative but substrates may be the more powerful force, as certain entrenched forms point to hard limits on learnability due to the substrate grammar, despite low input demand. Modelling contact as dynamic phases of individual learning embedded within a changing linguistic ecology helps to account for selective change over time within wider feature pools of variability. It also uses long-term outcomes of social contact to feed into theoretical questions of featural representations and learnability.