Next CLLEAR seminar: ‘I like to see a picture’: Tutor and student perspectives on the use of visuals in Chinese and British students’ writing

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 14th February 2018 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C (Room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “‘I like to see a picture’: Tutor and student perspectives on the use of visuals in Chinese and British students’ writing” and will be delivered by Maria Leedham from the Open University. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The traditional focus within the teaching of academic writing is on language produced as linear prose in genres such as the essay, report or case study, and little research has been conducted on the extent to which additional semiotic modes are used and how these are perceived by discipline tutors and by students. This paper analyses the use and perceptions of resources such as graphs, diagrams, and images (henceforth ‘visuals’), in assessed writing from two student groups: L1 Chinese and L1 English undergraduates in three disciplines (Biological Sciences, Economics and Engineering). The paper explores a dataset of undergraduate assignments drawn from the 6.5 million word British Academic Written English corpus, using corpus linguistic procedures combined with textual analysis. This reveals that the L1 Chinese students make significantly greater use of visuals and also lists than L1 English students in the same disciplines. The presentation then reports on findings from interviews with tutors and students (n=30), exploring their views. It is suggested that academic writing tutors could provide more guidance to all undergraduate students as to the range of acceptable ways of meaning making within assessed undergraduate writing.

Call for papers – 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching Special Interest Group

CLLEAR
University of Southampton

BAAL

“Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes” – the 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching Special Interest Group

12 & 13 July 2018

Hosted by the Centre for Language Learning, Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Fiona Copland – University of Stirling
John Gray – UCL Institute of Education
Tony Liddicoat – University of Warwick

CONFERENCE THEME: “Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes”

The theme of the LLT SIG conference at Southampton in 2018 will enable participants to discuss the challenges offered to traditional language education policy and practice by increasing interconnected globalization and changing conceptions of identity, accompanied by a rise in global migratory flows, resurgent nationalism and social inequality. These challenges have both foreseen and unforeseen consequences for the development and implementation of language education policy, and for teaching, learning and assessment practices. We invite papers and posters which make a contribution to understanding the issues which arise in the pre-school, school, and university language curriculum, in community-based and online learning and teaching contexts, and in the evaluation and management processes which shape language education experiences.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Abstracts are invited on any aspect of language teaching and learning, based on research in Applied Linguistics or related perspectives on language education. Abstracts which address the conference theme, and which relate to lesser taught languages, such as Chinese, will be particularly welcome.
Proposals are invited for paper presentations of 20 minutes + 5 minutes for questions. Poster proposals are also welcome. A title + abstract of maximum 250 words should be submitted. Abstracts should report original research and profile the context, objectives, method(s), and results of your study.
All proposals should be submitted by 16 March 2018 here.

SCHOLARSHIPS

A small number of scholarships covering the conference fee and accommodation are available for student presenters. To apply, please complete the scholarship field on the abstract submission page.
Notifications of the acceptance of abstracts will be sent out by 16 April 2018, and those awarded scholarships will be informed by 23 April 2018.

CONFERENCE FEES

BAAL Members: £160
Non-BAAL Members: £185
Students/Unwaged(Baal members and non-members): £135
The conference fee includes: registration, teas/coffees, and lunch.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
You can register for the conference, and book accommodation on campus for campus for 1 or 2 nights (£42 per night), and the conference dinner at St Mary’s football stadium (£50, including transport) at the University of Southampton Online Store.

For further general information please visit the conference website, and follow our latest updates through our Facebook group and Twitter account.
Specific questions and inquiries can be submitted to E.M.Forward@soton.ac.uk.
Conference co-chairs: Richard Kiely and Julia Huettner, Centre for Language Learning, Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL), University of Southampton.
Conference administrator: Erin Forward

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Next CLLEAR seminar: Beyond Borders, Beyond Words: Issues & Challenges in Developing An Open-Access Multimodal Corpus of L2 Academic English from A Sino-British University

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 25th January 2018 at 16:00 in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Beyond Borders, Beyond Words: Issues & Challenges in Developing An Open-Access Multimodal Corpus of L2 Academic English from A Sino-British University” and will be delivered by Dr. Yu-Hua Chen from the University of Nottingham, Ningbo Campus. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

The Corpus of UNNC Chinese Academic Written and Spoken English (UNNC CAWSE) is an ongoing project which aims to build a large collection of Chinese students’ English language samples from one of the few English-medium instruction (EMI) universities in China. The campus creates a unique environment for teaching and learning and also provides exciting opportunities for linguistic studies into Academic English from diverse theoretical and analytical perspectives. The project collects students’ language samples from a variety of assessment tasks (both written and spoken) and speech events (spoken and multi-modal) from the preliminary-year programme at UNNC. The final product of UNNC CAWSE will offer open-access electronic resources (including a multi-modal subcorpus) available for researchers and practitioners who are interested in a wide range of topics, including for example Second Language Acquisition (SLA), English for Academic Purposes (EAP), English as a Lingual Franca (ELF)/World Englishes, and many other aspects of the Written and Spoken English unique to this new corpus.

This talk will first introduce this unique UNNC CAWSE corpus including its design and construction process. Then various challenges and issues arising from using innovative approaches in constructing an L2 multimodal corpus will be described and discussed. Based on our current data transcription and annotation, some preliminary findings which share certain characteristics with ELF will also be presented.

Next CLLEAR seminar: The effects of structured-input and structured-output tasks on the acquisition of English causative

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 18th October 2017 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The effects of structured-input and structured-output tasks on the acquisition of English causative” and will be delivered by Alessandro Benati from the University of Portsmouth. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

The experimental study presented in this paper (Benati and Batziou, 2017, 2018) considered the effects of structured-input and structured-output tasks when delivered in isolation and in combination. The effects of three different treatments (structured-input only; structured-output only; and a combination of structured-input and structured-output practice) were measured on the acquisition of English causative forms (feature affected by The First Noun Principle). Chinese adults and Greek school-age learners learning English participated in the study. Interpretation and production tests (sentence and discourse) were used as pre-test, immediate post-test, and delayed post-test. Results show that learners benefit from structured-input practice and maintain their ability to interpret and produce the target feature after that practice.

Next CLLEAR seminar: “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 25th May 2017 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable” and will be delivered by Jennifer Smith from the University of Glasgow and Sophie Holmes-Elliott the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion! Read more…

Next CLLEAR seminar: “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” – SEMINAR CANCELLED

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 17th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” and will be delivered by Professor Alessandro Benati from the University of Greenwich. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The present study explores the effects of structured input and structured output when delivered in isolation or in combination on the acquisition of the English causative. Research investigating the effects of processing instruction and meaning output-based instruction has provided some interesting and sometimes conflicting results. Additionally, there are a number of issues (e.g., measuring a combination of structured input and structured output, measuring discourse-level effects) that have not been fully and clearly addressed. To provide answers to the questions formulated in this study, two classroom experiments were carried out. In the first study, fifty-four Chinese university students (age 18-20) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to four groups: structured input only group (n=13); structured output only group (n=15); combined structured input and structured output group (n=16); control group (n=10). In the second study, thirty school-age Greek learners (age 10-12) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups: structured input only group (n=10); structured output only group (n=10); combined structured input and structured output group (n=10).

Only subjects who participated in all phases of each experiment and scored lower than 60% in the pre-tests were included in the final data collection. Instruction lasted for three hours. The control group received no instruction on the causative structure. Interpretation and production tasks were used in a pre-test and post-test design. The design included a delayed post-test battery (3 weeks after instruction) for both experiments. In the first study, the assessment tasks included an interpretation and production task at sentence-level, and an interpretation task at discourse-level. In the second study, an additional discourse-level production task was adopted along with the interpretation discourse-level task. The results indicated that learners who received structured input both in isolation and in combination benefitted more than learners receiving structured output only. These two groups were able to retain instructional gains three weeks later in all assessment measures.

Next CLLEAR seminar: “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Friday 5th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees” and will be delivered by Dr Neal Snape, Gunma Prefectural Women’s University and Chuo University in Japan. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous L2 studies by Shirahata (1995) and Tomiyama (2000) examined L1 Japanese L2 English child returnees suppliance of articles and a range of grammatical morphemes. Shirahata focused on age-related L2 acquisition while Tomiyama was concerned with L2 attrition. Both studies found omission in obligatory contexts, though little evidence of L2 attrition. We adopt a neutral position for our study as both acquisition and attrition are likely to be taking place in heritage language reversal cases. This study examines datasets from two L1 Japanese L2 English speakers. The sibling child returnees were born in Japan and lived 8 years in the U.S. before returning to Japan. The younger child (KS) was exposed to L2 English from 3 years of age and the older child (CS) was first exposed from 12 years of age. Background questionnaires revealed that they have high levels of proficiency in English, based on the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) scores. ‘The Frog Story’ (Mayer, 1979) was administered and the returnees’ narrations were recorded and transcribed. The two participants were compared on their article suppliance to address the following two research questions:
RQ1: Does reduced input limit success in acquisition or lead to attrition over time?
RQ2: Are there any differences between the returnees given the difference in age of acquisition?

Voice Onset Time
This longitudinal study examines whether the decline in exposure to L2 input experienced by YS produces changes in voice onset time (VOT). YS met with researchers six times over the span of six years. Each meeting required YS to complete ‘The Frog Story’ and a picture description task (Goad & White, 2008) to elicit spoken production. Each time YS was recorded using a video camera and an iPod. The recordings of each session were subsequently analyzed in Praat for production of words beginning with voiceless consonants /p/, /t/ and /k/. Once located in the recordings, words were cut out of the original full-length recordings so that a more detailed analysis of VOT could be conducted. The results of the analyses for all recordings (across six years) shows that YS’s L1 Japanese VOT values and L2 English VOT values are different in length and that there is no evidence of change or attrition in her VOT values for /p/, /t/ and /k/ in L2 English.

Modern Languages and Linguistics to host GASLA 14 conference

CLLEAR

The Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) in Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton will be hosting the 14th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition conference (GASLA 14) on 7-9 April 2017.

The conference provides a forum for discussion of recent, high quality research on second language acquisition, bilingual and multilingual acquisition, psycholinguistics and neurocognition. GASLA brings together researchers working on the nature, use, and development of interlanguage in all contexts of bilingual and multilingual acquisition. GASLA 14 will include, in addition to the main session, a special session on the linguistic input and its interaction with representation and processing.

Find out more on the conference website.

Next CLLEAR seminar: “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th March 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach” and will be delivered by Miguel Pérez-Milans, Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics from the Department of Culture, Communication and Media, UCL Institute of Education, University College London. All welcome! Read more…

Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.