CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 7th November: English Medium Instruction in Japan: Macro-level policies and micro-level practices at the nexus of language and content learning

CGEThe next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th November 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Heath Rose from the University of Oxford and is entitled “English Medium Instruction in Japan: Macro-level policies and micro-level practices at the nexus of language and content learning”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Internationalisation and English in the twenty-first century are inextricably intertwined, as universities turn to Englishisation in order to internationalise (Kirkpatrick, 2011). A side effect of internationalisation is the rapid emergence of English medium instruction (EMI) in higher education around the world, defined as ‘the use of the English language to teach academic subjects (other than English itself) in countries or jurisdictions where the first language (L1) of the majority of the population is not English’ (Macaro, 2018, p. 19). Wilkinson (2013, p. 3) notes that EMI programmes have become ‘commonplace in many institutes of higher education’, and Japan is noted to be an area of recent significant growth (see Galloway et al., 2017). This talk explores the language-related implications associated with policy and practice in EMI in Japan. It first takes a macro-level policy-perspective to explore the English-language implications of recent trends in Japanese HE (see Rose & McKinley, 2018). This is then followed by a micro-level practice-perspective exploring the relationships between proficiency, language-related challenges, motivation, and content learning outcomes, which are drawn from questionnaire, interviews, proficiency test, and content score datasets of more than 500 students in EMI contexts in Japan. Controlling for motivation, results revealed a strong interaction between proficiency and language-related challenges, as well as proficiency and success measures in EMI (in terms of course grades). An exploration of lexical range in EMI lectures also suggests a vocabulary threshold needed for students to understand some content subjects, and also points to the importance of subject-specific ESP courses. The study, therefore, equips English teachers with targeted areas of focus in order to best support students in EMI contexts, so they can be successful in their studies.

Heath Rose is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. His research interests are in EMI, Global Englishes and TESOL. His books include Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Rose & Galloway, 2019), Doing Research in Applied Linguistics (McKinley & Rose, 2017), The Japanese Writing System (Rose, 2017), and Introducing Global Englishes (Galloway & Rose, 2015).

CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 17th October: ‘Attitudes’ and English as a Lingua Franca

CGEThe first Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar of the academic year will take place on Wednesday 17th October 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Mariko Baird from International Baccalaureate and Rob Baird from the University of Southampton and is entitled “‘Attitudes’ and English as a Lingua Franca”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Although we are most famous for having the first Centre for Global Englishes wedding, in this talk we will address a more difficult relationship, namely between the English as a lingua franca (ELF) field of enquiry and language attitude research. Based on our recent chapter ‘English as a Lingua Franca: Changing Attitudes’ in the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca, we will draw on theoretical frameworks and empirical data, based on our fieldwork in East and South East Asia, to illustrate problems that accompany traditional language-attitude frameworks when applied to speakers who experience dynamic communicative contexts and associated constructs. Our talk will outline important considerations for researching people’s perceptions of language in ELF scenarios, and we will conclude by discussing implications for the empirical treatment of language in wider sociolinguistic research.

Both Mariko and Rob Baird are among the founding members of the Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) here in Southampton. Mariko researched ideas of language and the sociolinguistic realities of university students and business people in East Asia, and now is a Subject Manager for Language and Literature at International Baccalaureate (IB). Rob researched perceptions and communicative practices of English users in English-as-a-medium-of-instruction settings in East and South East Asia. He is now a Senior Teaching Fellow in the Academic Centre for International Students (ACIS) at the University of Southampton.

CGE Research Seminar on 9th May: Tutor-student interaction in one-to-one academic writing tutorials

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 9th May 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Professor Jane Setter from the University of Reading and is entitled “Suprasegmentals in South-East Asian Englishes”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Intonation is one of the earliest acquired aspects of human speech, and is now thought to be acquired pre-birth in a child’s first language (L1). L1-specific patterns of speech rhythm emerge shortly before a child is school-age. This presentation looks at some suprasegmental aspects of speakers who have English as a second (L2) or additional language, focusing on research on the emergent variety, Hong Kong English (HKE), and L2 English learners from Malaysia, China and Vietnam. We will consider patterns in the different speaker varieties, and also issues of teaching and learning.

CGE Research Seminar on 18th April: Tutor-student interaction in one-to-one academic writing tutorials

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 18th April 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Ursula Wingate from King’s College London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
One-to-one advice on academic writing, which has a long tradition in US universities, has recently proliferated in the UK university system. As this is a cost-intensive provision, evidence of teaching behaviours that lead to satisfactory outcomes for students is important. Previous research has identified dialogic instructional discourse, in which knowledge is scaffolded and co-constructed, as a feature successful tutorials (e.g. Haneda 2004; Thonus 2002). In a recent study, I analysed ten tutorials involving five tutors and eight students for interactional features related to dialogic teaching, focusing on exchange initiations, distribution of knower roles, and moves which facilitated extended sequences of exploratory talk. The findings show a prevalence of collaborative dialogue that enabled the joint construction of meaning and knowledge. However, there were also examples of monologic tutoring, characterised by a lack of questions and a high occurrence of unmitigated directives. Based on these findings, I make some recommendations for tutor training and the organisation of academic writing tutorials.

References:
Haneda, M. (2004). The joint construction of meaning in writing conferences. Applied Linguistics 25, 178–219.
Thonus, T. (2002). Tutor and student assessments of academic writing tutorials: What is “success”? Assessing Writing 8, 110–134.

CGE Research Seminar on 7th February: Investigating implicit-explicit language attitude discrepancy (IED) to examine language attitude change in progress

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th February 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Robert McKenzie from the University of Northumbria. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
This talk details the results of a recent study employing an Implicit Association Test (IAT) and self-report attitude scale, measuring the relationship between 90 Newcastle-based English nationals’ implicit and explicit ratings of Northern English and Southern English speech. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant implicit-explicit attitude discrepancy (IED), providing evidence of language attitude change in progress, led by younger females, with explicit attitudes changing more rapidly towards a greater tolerance of the English spoken in the north of England. The study findings are discussed in relation to the potential changing status of Northern and Southern English speech in the north of England. Suggestions for additional ways in which implicit and explicit attitude measures can be usefully employed by sociolinguists and applied linguists are also offered.

CGE Research Seminar on 6th December: Exploring Brazilian teachers’ attitudes to an ELF-oriented pedagogy

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 6th December 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Alessia Cogo from Goldsmiths, University of London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Research into language teachers’ attitudes towards ELF generally, and an ELF-oriented pedagogy specifically, has been solidly advancing since Jenkins’ (2007) seminal publication in this area. However, relatively little research has focused on teachers at different stages of their professional development (in-service or pre-service), in relation to their previous educational experiences and to the context of their teaching. This study is an investigation with in-service and pre-service teachers in Brazil, which attempts to tackle such aspects. The work was conducted in 2015 with teachers from Salvador, Brazil. Findings suggest that regardless of the differences in experience, the background knowledge and educational upbringing of both groups are key for their understanding and development of ELF-oriented teaching in their own context and classes.

CGE Research Seminar on 8th November: English as a Lingua Franca and language assessment: Challenges and opportunities

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th November 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Luke Harding from Lancaster University. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) communication represents one of the most significant challenges to language testing and assessment since the advent of the communicative revolution. On one hand, ELF destabilises the place of the native speaker, and the notion of assessing against a “stable variety” (Jenkins & Leung, 2014, p.4). At the same time, however, research emerging from ELF studies suggests opportunities for reconceptualising and expanding language constructs. In this talk I will discuss the challenges and opportunities afforded by an English as a Lingua Franca perspective on language assessment. In the first part of the talk, I will describe the two fundamental challenges ELF presents for language assessment, and connect these with broader debates around the nature of communicative competence. I will then discuss how the language testing and assessment community has addressed the ELF challenge thus far, with examples from both scholarship and testing practice. Third, I will sketch an ELF construct for assessment purposes, and present two cases of small-scale studies which have attempted to operationalise this construct. Finally, I will discuss some new directions for research at the interface of ELF and language assessment.

CGE Research Seminar today: Launching the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place today, Wednesday 11th October 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar celebrates the launch of the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca by Will Baker, Martin Dewey and Jennifer Jenkins. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Last month, Routledge published the first ever Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca. For our first research CGE seminar of this new year, we therefore decided that it would be appropriate to focus on the Handbook and its historic place in the development of ELF research. Jennifer Jenkins’s brief introduction will consider why such a Handbook was needed at this time in ELF’s trajectory and discuss the Handbook’s development. The three co-editors, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, and Jennifer Jenkins, will then each say a few words about their own Handbook chapter (respectively, ‘ELF and Intercultural Communication’, ‘ELF and Teacher Education’, and ‘The Future of ELF?’). This will be followed by a reception during which wine, soft drinks and nibbles will be served, and a copy of the Routledge Handbook of ELF will be raffled. For the purposes of the raffle, each member of the audience will be issued with a raffle ticket on arrival at the seminar.

Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.

Next CGE seminar: Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?’ and will be led by Dr Sonia Morán Panero from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I explore how university students from the Spanish-speaking world conceptualise and evaluate the notion of English as a global language, and the variability emerging from its unprecedented spread and lingua franca use. Drawing from a qualitative interview study of students’ elicited metalanguage in Chile, Mexico and Spain, I report on a) the functions and social meanings that are assigned to English between global and local spheres of use, b) students’ conceptualisations and evaluations of their own and others’ ways of speaking, and c) participants’ ideas on what the use of English as a lingua franca is/should be like in relation to intelligibility, correctness, variability and identity expression. The investigation reveals the multiple and often conflicted conceptualisations with which participants construct their evaluations, and the diverse possibilities for identification that these ‘non-native’ users of English find in the language. It also illustrates how broader language ideologies (e.g. native-speaker, standard, variation-friendly ideologies) can be reproduced, re-negotiated and/or challenged in metalinguistic practice. I will reflect on the implications that the observed ontological complexity can have for ELT, and consider the pedagogical opportunities that explicit talk about language has to offer for the language classroom.