Tag Archives: Centre for Global Englishes

CGE Research Seminar on 9th May: Tutor-student interaction in one-to-one academic writing tutorials

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 9th May 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Professor Jane Setter from the University of Reading and is entitled “Suprasegmentals in South-East Asian Englishes”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Intonation is one of the earliest acquired aspects of human speech, and is now thought to be acquired pre-birth in a child’s first language (L1). L1-specific patterns of speech rhythm emerge shortly before a child is school-age. This presentation looks at some suprasegmental aspects of speakers who have English as a second (L2) or additional language, focusing on research on the emergent variety, Hong Kong English (HKE), and L2 English learners from Malaysia, China and Vietnam. We will consider patterns in the different speaker varieties, and also issues of teaching and learning.

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CGE Research Seminar on 18th April: Tutor-student interaction in one-to-one academic writing tutorials

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 18th April 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Ursula Wingate from King’s College London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
One-to-one advice on academic writing, which has a long tradition in US universities, has recently proliferated in the UK university system. As this is a cost-intensive provision, evidence of teaching behaviours that lead to satisfactory outcomes for students is important. Previous research has identified dialogic instructional discourse, in which knowledge is scaffolded and co-constructed, as a feature successful tutorials (e.g. Haneda 2004; Thonus 2002). In a recent study, I analysed ten tutorials involving five tutors and eight students for interactional features related to dialogic teaching, focusing on exchange initiations, distribution of knower roles, and moves which facilitated extended sequences of exploratory talk. The findings show a prevalence of collaborative dialogue that enabled the joint construction of meaning and knowledge. However, there were also examples of monologic tutoring, characterised by a lack of questions and a high occurrence of unmitigated directives. Based on these findings, I make some recommendations for tutor training and the organisation of academic writing tutorials.

References:
Haneda, M. (2004). The joint construction of meaning in writing conferences. Applied Linguistics 25, 178–219.
Thonus, T. (2002). Tutor and student assessments of academic writing tutorials: What is “success”? Assessing Writing 8, 110–134.

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CGE Research Seminar on 7th February: Investigating implicit-explicit language attitude discrepancy (IED) to examine language attitude change in progress

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th February 2018 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Robert McKenzie from the University of Northumbria. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
This talk details the results of a recent study employing an Implicit Association Test (IAT) and self-report attitude scale, measuring the relationship between 90 Newcastle-based English nationals’ implicit and explicit ratings of Northern English and Southern English speech. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant implicit-explicit attitude discrepancy (IED), providing evidence of language attitude change in progress, led by younger females, with explicit attitudes changing more rapidly towards a greater tolerance of the English spoken in the north of England. The study findings are discussed in relation to the potential changing status of Northern and Southern English speech in the north of England. Suggestions for additional ways in which implicit and explicit attitude measures can be usefully employed by sociolinguists and applied linguists are also offered.

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CGE Research Seminar on 6th December: Exploring Brazilian teachers’ attitudes to an ELF-oriented pedagogy

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 6th December 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Alessia Cogo from Goldsmiths, University of London. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Research into language teachers’ attitudes towards ELF generally, and an ELF-oriented pedagogy specifically, has been solidly advancing since Jenkins’ (2007) seminal publication in this area. However, relatively little research has focused on teachers at different stages of their professional development (in-service or pre-service), in relation to their previous educational experiences and to the context of their teaching. This study is an investigation with in-service and pre-service teachers in Brazil, which attempts to tackle such aspects. The work was conducted in 2015 with teachers from Salvador, Brazil. Findings suggest that regardless of the differences in experience, the background knowledge and educational upbringing of both groups are key for their understanding and development of ELF-oriented teaching in their own context and classes.

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CGE Research Seminar on 8th November: English as a Lingua Franca and language assessment: Challenges and opportunities

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th November 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Dr Luke Harding from Lancaster University. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) communication represents one of the most significant challenges to language testing and assessment since the advent of the communicative revolution. On one hand, ELF destabilises the place of the native speaker, and the notion of assessing against a “stable variety” (Jenkins & Leung, 2014, p.4). At the same time, however, research emerging from ELF studies suggests opportunities for reconceptualising and expanding language constructs. In this talk I will discuss the challenges and opportunities afforded by an English as a Lingua Franca perspective on language assessment. In the first part of the talk, I will describe the two fundamental challenges ELF presents for language assessment, and connect these with broader debates around the nature of communicative competence. I will then discuss how the language testing and assessment community has addressed the ELF challenge thus far, with examples from both scholarship and testing practice. Third, I will sketch an ELF construct for assessment purposes, and present two cases of small-scale studies which have attempted to operationalise this construct. Finally, I will discuss some new directions for research at the interface of ELF and language assessment.

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CGE Research Seminar today: Launching the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place today, Wednesday 11th October 2017 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar celebrates the launch of the Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca by Will Baker, Martin Dewey and Jennifer Jenkins. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Last month, Routledge published the first ever Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca. For our first research CGE seminar of this new year, we therefore decided that it would be appropriate to focus on the Handbook and its historic place in the development of ELF research. Jennifer Jenkins’s brief introduction will consider why such a Handbook was needed at this time in ELF’s trajectory and discuss the Handbook’s development. The three co-editors, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, and Jennifer Jenkins, will then each say a few words about their own Handbook chapter (respectively, ‘ELF and Intercultural Communication’, ‘ELF and Teacher Education’, and ‘The Future of ELF?’). This will be followed by a reception during which wine, soft drinks and nibbles will be served, and a copy of the Routledge Handbook of ELF will be raffled. For the purposes of the raffle, each member of the audience will be issued with a raffle ticket on arrival at the seminar.

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Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.

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Next CGE seminar: Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?’ and will be led by Dr Sonia Morán Panero from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I explore how university students from the Spanish-speaking world conceptualise and evaluate the notion of English as a global language, and the variability emerging from its unprecedented spread and lingua franca use. Drawing from a qualitative interview study of students’ elicited metalanguage in Chile, Mexico and Spain, I report on a) the functions and social meanings that are assigned to English between global and local spheres of use, b) students’ conceptualisations and evaluations of their own and others’ ways of speaking, and c) participants’ ideas on what the use of English as a lingua franca is/should be like in relation to intelligibility, correctness, variability and identity expression. The investigation reveals the multiple and often conflicted conceptualisations with which participants construct their evaluations, and the diverse possibilities for identification that these ‘non-native’ users of English find in the language. It also illustrates how broader language ideologies (e.g. native-speaker, standard, variation-friendly ideologies) can be reproduced, re-negotiated and/or challenged in metalinguistic practice. I will reflect on the implications that the observed ontological complexity can have for ELT, and consider the pedagogical opportunities that explicit talk about language has to offer for the language classroom.

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Next CGE seminar: Communicating across online and offline spaces: a mobile-supported business model for migrant micro-entrepreneurs

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th December 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, “Communicating across online and offline spaces: a mobile-supported business model for migrant micro-entrepreneurs” and will be led by Dr Caroline Tagg from The Open University. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I draw on data from a large ethnographic project to explore the ways in which migrant small-business owners exploit mobile phone messaging apps to do business, establish and maintain informal support networks, and perform identities as entrepreneurs of a particular heritage background. The project is the AHRC-funded, four-year ‘Translation and Translanguaging: investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in superdiverse wards in four UK cites’ (PI: Angela Creese, University of Birmingham). Key participants are observed, recorded and interviewed at work and home, a well-established ethnographic approach which is innovatively augmented by the parallel collection of social media data.

My talk focuses on the social media use of two entrepreneurial couples: Chinese butchers in Birmingham and Polish shop-owners in London. Analysis of their SMS, WeChat and Viber messages, informed by the interview and interactional data collected at work and home, shows that mobile messaging apps are facilitating the emergence of a new business model characterised by dynamic configurations of time and space. I detail how the mobile phone serves as a gateway to physical contexts such as the shop whilst also facilitating asynchronous communication which we describe as a ‘virtual noticeboard’. I also explore how the mobile makes possible the creation of a support network which stretches from the surrounding UK city to the migrants’ home countries, and how the migrants draw on different timescales – immediate concerns and shared cultural histories – in managing these relationships. In documenting this new model, I explore the ways in which the entrepreneurs construct, negotiate and exploit multiple layers of flexible and selective ‘timespaces’, transgressing traditional boundaries of time and space and creating new intersections between virtual and physical space as they fulfil everyday functions.

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Next CGE seminar: Research to classroom practice: Global Englishes and ELT textbooks

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Research to classroom practice: Global Englishes and ELT textbooks’ and will be led by Dr Nicola Galloway from the University of Edinburgh. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
“the prevailing orientation in…..ELT materials still remains undoubtedly towards ENL” (Jenkins, 2012: 487).
Theoretical and empirical work within the field of Global Englishes raises crucial questions about established modes of practice in the ELT profession. The pedagogical implications of such research have been attracting an increasing amount of attention in recent years, yet little attention has been placed on ELT materials specifically. In order to create pedagogical change within the field of ELT, we need to look at various aspects of the learning and teaching process: “it is not enough to simply say that ELF has implications for pedagogy” (Dewey, 2012: 143). ELT materials are a central part of the learning and teaching process; they provide language input and are often used to determine the syllabus. The continued orientation towards native English, as outlined by Jenkins (2012) above, clearly warrants serious attention. This presentation examines current textbooks, which have been identified as one of the main barriers to Global Englishes Language Teaching (GELT) (Galloway, 2011; Galloway and Rose, 2015). A central thesis of this talk focuses on the need to ensure that 21st century ELT is effective in preparing learners to use ELF in global contexts. It examines recent trends in the field of ELT, proposing that the on-going quest for new approaches and methods be accompanied with a quest for new conceptualisations of the very subject matter in such materials; the English language. The talk ends with a proposed framework to help ELT practitioners adopt and develop materials that offer more than a mere superficial awareness of Global Englishes.

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