Tag Archives: Centre for Transnational Studies

Next TNS seminar: Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)

TNSAnne O’Connor from NUI Galway will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 16th May 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)’. All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
This talk will look at the transnationality of religion and how the spread of religion is supported by the printed word. It will use the example of global Catholicism and devotional reading to question how orthodoxies emanating from the Vatican reach the lives of Catholics in the Anglophone world. It will look at the intersection of translation, book history and religion to examine how each can work together and provide momentum for transnational influence. By focusing on the materiality of the transmitted words, the talk will discuss how popular printing allowed for the transnational to enter the domestic sphere.

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Next TNS seminar in conjunction with the Department of Film: ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’

TNSDeborah Shaw from the University of Portsmouth will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 21st February 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’ and will be delivered in conjunction with the Department of Film. All staff and students are welcome! Here is the abstract:

This paper aims to present an overview of some key developments in ways of conceptualising the transnational in film studies. It considers the reasons for the late adoption of the transnational in film studies in relation to the social sciences. 2005 sees the beginning of a transnational momentum in our discipline with the following years seeing a number of conceptual and theoretical essays and edited volumes and the founding of a journal, Transnational Cinemas in 2010. The paper outlines the key areas of focus in what I am identifying as the first phase of transnational cinema studies and considers question of scales of value that have been applied to the transnational. Following this, the paper discusses approaches to transnational film theory through an analysis of a selection of definitional essays. The final section of the paper presents an overview of what I am characterising as the second phase of transnational film studies, and considers the expanded reach of the transnational to the many areas that make up the discipline.

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Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.

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Next TNS seminar: “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”. The seminar will be presented by Professor Patrick Stevenson from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. All welcome! Read more…

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Next TNS seminar of the ‘Moving Stories’ series

TNS

The next seminar of the 2016-17 ‘Moving Stories’ Centre for Transational Studies (TNS) seminar series will take place on Wednesday 14th December 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm, and will be presented jointly by Dr Eleanor Jones and Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. Eleanor’s presentation is entitled “Death stories: encountering the corpse in narratives of Lusophone Africa”, and Scott will be presenting on “(Re)moving stories: closure and commemoration at the Gurs internment camp”.

The TNS ‘moving stories’ series involves stories that move literally across borders and contexts, as well as stories which move us emotionally. As students of societies, histories and cultures we often engage stories in order to understand and analyse our subject. Stories come in different forms: biographies and life narratives; oral histories; personal and collective memories; material-object stories; poems; novels; legends; myths; visual narratives; music; art; news and media stories; non-fictional sources.

All welcome! Watch this space for details of future TNS seminars.

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Next TNS event: ‘Cross-Faculty Debate on Migration Research’

TNS

The Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) and the interdisciplinary Migration@Soton Research Network are organising a joint meeting to discuss the current state of the art in migration research, and to develop new plans for joint initiatives in research projects and joint publications.

This event will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 27th April 2016 in Room 1177, Building 65, Avenue Campus, and is entitled ‘Cross-Faculty Debate on Migration Research’. The informal group discussion will begin with brief three-minute introductions to participants’ respective research agendas, leading to an open debate. Anyone interested in migration research in the Humanities or the Social Sciences is welcome to attend.

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POSTPONED to 4th May: TNS Seminar: “‘A place of utter desolation and abandonment…’: Administrative noise, neglect and the commemoration of the camp de Gurs.”

*** Please note: The seminer was originally scheduled for Wednesday 10th February but has now been postponed until Wednesday 4th May ***

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 10th February 2016 in Room 1177, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The session is entitled “‘A place of utter desolation and abandonment…’: Administrative noise, neglect and the commemoration of the camp de Gurs” and will be led by Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The camp de Gurs was an internment centre that was initially built in 1939 for refugees from the Spanish Civil War. It continued to be used throughout WWII and became implicated in the Final Solution when German Jewish internees were deported to Auschwitz. While much is known about the internees’ experiences of Gurs and the operation of the camp, we know very little about what happened at the site once the camp was closed down. This paper sets out to explain how the camp was dismantled and then transformed into a place of commemorative activity through a focus on the camp cemetery. The analysis of local and national state archives will point towards a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics surrounding the construction and development of remembrance narratives in post-war France that necessarily accounts for both international factors and transnational processes.

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Joint TNS and Archaeology seminar: ‘Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage’

TNS

A joint Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) and Archaeology seminar will be taking place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 9th December 2015, in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage’ and will be presented by Dr Rodney Harrison, Reader in Archaeology, Heritage and Museum Studies at University College London and Director of the Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage research programme. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

How does heritage make the future? From nuclear waste in Sweden to global endangered languages, from a frozen genetic ‘Ark’ in Nottingham to the global seed vault in Arctic Norway, and from ‘rewilded’ landscapes in Portugal to paper-based archives in Paris, Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage (AAFH) aims to develop a broad, international and cross-sectoral comparative framework for understanding ‘heritage’ not as a domain which is concerned with the past, but rather as a series of heterogeneous yet distinctive practices oriented towards assembling (alternative) futures. This paper introduces this collaborative research project, which involves a team of 10 researchers, 3 PhD students and 21 international partner organisations, and aims to show how its broad themes relate to some of the most pressing ecological, social and political issues of our time.

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Next TNS Seminar: ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences?’

Impact

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 25th November 2015 in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The session is entitled ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences’. The discussion of this topic will be introduced by short presentations of three authors of impact studies in the last REF: Professor Wrigley from Geography, Professor Jon Adams from Archaeology and Professor Ulrike Meinhof from Modern Languages. All welcome!

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Open seminar: Perspectives on intercultural communication and intercultural communicative competence

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An open seminar hosted by the CGE, CLLEAR, TNS and MEXSU entitled ‘Perspectives on intercultural communication and intercultural communicative competence’ will take place on Wednesday 11th November 2015 from 5:00-6:30pm at Avenue Campus, Building 65, Lecture Theatre C. In this panel discussion, Professor Marion Demossier, Dr Will Baker and Dr Karin Zotzmann from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton will each discuss their own approach to these notions, after which they will join in discussion with the audience. All welcome!

Here is a further description of the context of this seminar:

In our age of superdiversity and unprecedented mobility (both actual and virtual, and temporary and permanent), communication across language and cultural boundaries has become the norm for many of us. Intercultural communication has therefore become a practical necessity in a wide range of settings around the globe, and as a result, intercultural communication and intercultural communicative competence have become key areas of theorisation and research within applied and socio-linguistics.

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