Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar on Wednesday 6th March: Who defines what it means to be “disabled” in China today?

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 6th March from 4-5pm in room 1177 at Avenue Campus (Building 65) in collaboration with the Confucius Institute. The seminar is entitled “Who defines what it means to be ‘disabled’ in China today?” and will be presented by Dr Sarah Dauncey from the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Nottingham. All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
In this talk, Sarah Dauncey looks at the construction of disabled identities specifically from the perspective of Chinese cultural epistemologies. Drawing on sociological theories of citizenship, her research reveals how traditionally accepted notions of personhood are often fundamentally challenged through encounters and interactions with understandings of disability and impairment. She provides engaging examples of the ways in which representations and narratives of disability negotiate the identity of their subject(s) in relation to dominant discourses, where collective social, political and cultural understandings of what it means to live a ‘productive’ disabled life are both imbued and contested. Her findings offer new evidence as to the importance of intersectional accounts of disabled citizenship in revealing the complex and shifting power relationships between disabled individuals and/or groups and the state in any particular country or specific cultural context.

More information on Dr Dauncey can be found on her profile page.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar on Wednesday 20th February: Mental Health under Communism

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 20th Febuary from 4-5pm in room 1177 at Avenue Campus (Building 65) in collaboration with the Centre for Medical and Health Humanities. The seminar is entitled “Mental Health under Communism: Transnational Connections across the Iron Curtain and within the Eastern Bloc.” All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
Historians have traditionally assumed that the psy-disciplines behind the Iron Curtain, when they were not being abused for political purposes, were dominated by a topdown ‘Pavlovisation’, whereby Moscow bound scientists within the restrictive orthodoxy of theories derived from the celebrated Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov. In this paper I demonstrate that researchers were far from isolated from international developments – whether in the broader Soviet sphere, China, or the ‘West’ – and appropriated a broad range of theoretical models, including some which the Party had officially banned. Antipsychotic drugs were adopted from the West and mass-produced by state-owned firms. Psychoanalysis survived underground, coming into plain sight as theories of the unconscious influenced the world’s longest-running, state-sponsored LSD psychotherapy project in Prague between 1954 and1974. New models of mind from cybernetics, human ecology and infant attachment theory re-shaped research, treatment and even state-level policy. By tracing these transnational connections this paper challenges narratives of overwhelming state control. It traces the strategies that individuals used to further their professional and personal interests, both underground and in plain sight, and the examples of psychiatrists who engaged – whether explicitly or reluctantly – in the project of building socialism as a result.

More information on Dr Marks can be found on her profile page.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: ‘Just Like It Is at Home!’: Being Deaf across the Socialist Bloc

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 30th January from 4-5pm in room 1177 at Avenue Campus (Building 65) in collaboration with the Centre for Medical and Health Humanities. The seminar is entitled ‘”Just Like It Is at Home!”: Being Deaf across the Socialist Bloc.’ All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
The years following the Second World War and the sovietisation of Eastern Europe saw increased links between the Soviet deaf community and their Eastern European ‘brothers’. On one level, these links were institutional, with the All-Russian Society of the Deaf reaching out to equivalent deaf societies across the Eastern Bloc, culminating in the creation of an international Socialist Union of Deaf Mutes in the tumultuous year of 1968. At the same time, they were informal, familial, and grassroots, as groups of deaf people travelled across the socialist bloc and encountered people and institutions – both deaf and socialist – just like their own. This paper will explore these contacts as part of a concerted attempt to define the ‘socialist deaf person’. In the context of heightened international tensions and the consumerist competition of the Cold War, the socialist deaf community was seen as a success story worth celebrating: a group of people who had overcome the physical obstacle of deafness to become full-blooded, independent workers through the transformative power of socialism. Yet these contacts also revealed tensions, differences and misunderstandings and posited uncomfortable hierarchies between the ‘big brother’ USSR and the ‘little brother’ countries of Eastern Europe. As such, the transnational links of the late Soviet era reveal both commonalities and differences of deaf experience, and suggest that perhaps ‘socialist deafness’ was perhaps not as monolithic as its proponents might like to think.

More information on Dr Shaw can be found on her profile page.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 21st November from 3-4pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?’ All staff and students are welcome!

The seminar is entitled Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations? Here is the abstract for the seminar:
Contemporary Eastern Europe is currently, once more, one of the spaces for the rise of far right, fascist agendas, as much as increasingly dominated by the rule of heteronormatively imagined futures. To an extent, the “region” holds a shared socialist history of gender inequality and in places like Romania, long histories of slavery and domination over Roma populations. In this contemporaneity that hardly feels shared, where does a decolonial project need to start from? What kind of “whiteness” are we talking about when talking about Eastern European, former socialist subjects? Why are intersectional issues of race, gender and sexuality historically enmeshed but also often invisible from critical contemporary evaluations of the aesthetics and politics of the “region”? I propose to turn to a specific historicalcontextual moment of the Non-Aligned Movement as a point of departure in this analysis to ask what type of imagination and what forms of futurity were projected from socialist Eastern Europe onto some of the late colonial, soon to be independent countries in Africa.

The seminar will be led by Dr Mihaela Brebenel, Lecturer in Digital Media Culture at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Mihaela is interested in screen studies, film theory, media archaeology, aesthetic theory, the politics of the audiovisual, feminist practices with moving images, the cultural production of subjectivity in contemporary technologically-mediated contexts, historiographies and critical uses of archival images in academic and artistic practice. She also reflects in her work on gender, performance and interventions exploring the private and public configurations of media, space, memory, and the possibilities of collective work.

We have arranged for the event to finish on time for colleagues who wish to attend the Advanced Research in Arts and Humanities seminar at 4pm, and the event is held in the same building.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity

TNSThe Centre for Transnational Studies, in collaboration with the Centre for Imperial and Postcolonial Studies, is hosting its first event of the academic year on Wednesday 31st October from 3-4:30pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity’. All staff and students are welcome!

The event is a postgraduate and early career masterclass run by Dr Maria Tomlinson, a postdoctoral research associate on the project ‘FemmepowermentNiger’ based in the Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield. The idea with these masterclasses is for students (PGT and PGR) and interested staff to get an introduction to potential new ways of approaching their work, and for students to have a chance to talk to someone a few years further on in the postgrad and academic career journey. Dr Tomlinson was one of the first cohort of AHRC SWW DTP students, and completed her PhD in French between the Universities of Bristol and Reading earlier this year. She also set up one of the first SWW DTP research clusters on gender and sexuality.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

Next TNS seminar: Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)

TNSAnne O’Connor from NUI Galway will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 16th May 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)’. All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
This talk will look at the transnationality of religion and how the spread of religion is supported by the printed word. It will use the example of global Catholicism and devotional reading to question how orthodoxies emanating from the Vatican reach the lives of Catholics in the Anglophone world. It will look at the intersection of translation, book history and religion to examine how each can work together and provide momentum for transnational influence. By focusing on the materiality of the transmitted words, the talk will discuss how popular printing allowed for the transnational to enter the domestic sphere.

Next TNS seminar in conjunction with the Department of Film: ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’

TNSDeborah Shaw from the University of Portsmouth will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 21st February 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’ and will be delivered in conjunction with the Department of Film. All staff and students are welcome! Here is the abstract:

This paper aims to present an overview of some key developments in ways of conceptualising the transnational in film studies. It considers the reasons for the late adoption of the transnational in film studies in relation to the social sciences. 2005 sees the beginning of a transnational momentum in our discipline with the following years seeing a number of conceptual and theoretical essays and edited volumes and the founding of a journal, Transnational Cinemas in 2010. The paper outlines the key areas of focus in what I am identifying as the first phase of transnational cinema studies and considers question of scales of value that have been applied to the transnational. Following this, the paper discusses approaches to transnational film theory through an analysis of a selection of definitional essays. The final section of the paper presents an overview of what I am characterising as the second phase of transnational film studies, and considers the expanded reach of the transnational to the many areas that make up the discipline.

Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.

Next TNS seminar: “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”. The seminar will be presented by Professor Patrick Stevenson from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. All welcome! Read more…

Next TNS seminar of the ‘Moving Stories’ series

TNS

The next seminar of the 2016-17 ‘Moving Stories’ Centre for Transational Studies (TNS) seminar series will take place on Wednesday 14th December 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm, and will be presented jointly by Dr Eleanor Jones and Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. Eleanor’s presentation is entitled “Death stories: encountering the corpse in narratives of Lusophone Africa”, and Scott will be presenting on “(Re)moving stories: closure and commemoration at the Gurs internment camp”.

The TNS ‘moving stories’ series involves stories that move literally across borders and contexts, as well as stories which move us emotionally. As students of societies, histories and cultures we often engage stories in order to understand and analyse our subject. Stories come in different forms: biographies and life narratives; oral histories; personal and collective memories; material-object stories; poems; novels; legends; myths; visual narratives; music; art; news and media stories; non-fictional sources.

All welcome! Watch this space for details of future TNS seminars.