Tag Archives: CLLEAR

Next CLLEAR seminar: “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 25th May 2017 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable” and will be delivered by Jennifer Smith from the University of Glasgow and Sophie Holmes-Elliott the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion! Read more…

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” – SEMINAR CANCELLED

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 17th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” and will be delivered by Professor Alessandro Benati from the University of Greenwich. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The present study explores the effects of structured input and structured output when delivered in isolation or in combination on the acquisition of the English causative. Research investigating the effects of processing instruction and meaning output-based instruction has provided some interesting and sometimes conflicting results. Additionally, there are a number of issues (e.g., measuring a combination of structured input and structured output, measuring discourse-level effects) that have not been fully and clearly addressed. To provide answers to the questions formulated in this study, two classroom experiments were carried out. In the first study, fifty-four Chinese university students (age 18-20) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to four groups: structured input only group (n=13); structured output only group (n=15); combined structured input and structured output group (n=16); control group (n=10). In the second study, thirty school-age Greek learners (age 10-12) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups: structured input only group (n=10); structured output only group (n=10); combined structured input and structured output group (n=10).

Only subjects who participated in all phases of each experiment and scored lower than 60% in the pre-tests were included in the final data collection. Instruction lasted for three hours. The control group received no instruction on the causative structure. Interpretation and production tasks were used in a pre-test and post-test design. The design included a delayed post-test battery (3 weeks after instruction) for both experiments. In the first study, the assessment tasks included an interpretation and production task at sentence-level, and an interpretation task at discourse-level. In the second study, an additional discourse-level production task was adopted along with the interpretation discourse-level task. The results indicated that learners who received structured input both in isolation and in combination benefitted more than learners receiving structured output only. These two groups were able to retain instructional gains three weeks later in all assessment measures.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Friday 5th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees” and will be delivered by Dr Neal Snape, Gunma Prefectural Women’s University and Chuo University in Japan. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous L2 studies by Shirahata (1995) and Tomiyama (2000) examined L1 Japanese L2 English child returnees suppliance of articles and a range of grammatical morphemes. Shirahata focused on age-related L2 acquisition while Tomiyama was concerned with L2 attrition. Both studies found omission in obligatory contexts, though little evidence of L2 attrition. We adopt a neutral position for our study as both acquisition and attrition are likely to be taking place in heritage language reversal cases. This study examines datasets from two L1 Japanese L2 English speakers. The sibling child returnees were born in Japan and lived 8 years in the U.S. before returning to Japan. The younger child (KS) was exposed to L2 English from 3 years of age and the older child (CS) was first exposed from 12 years of age. Background questionnaires revealed that they have high levels of proficiency in English, based on the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) scores. ‘The Frog Story’ (Mayer, 1979) was administered and the returnees’ narrations were recorded and transcribed. The two participants were compared on their article suppliance to address the following two research questions:
RQ1: Does reduced input limit success in acquisition or lead to attrition over time?
RQ2: Are there any differences between the returnees given the difference in age of acquisition?

Voice Onset Time
This longitudinal study examines whether the decline in exposure to L2 input experienced by YS produces changes in voice onset time (VOT). YS met with researchers six times over the span of six years. Each meeting required YS to complete ‘The Frog Story’ and a picture description task (Goad & White, 2008) to elicit spoken production. Each time YS was recorded using a video camera and an iPod. The recordings of each session were subsequently analyzed in Praat for production of words beginning with voiceless consonants /p/, /t/ and /k/. Once located in the recordings, words were cut out of the original full-length recordings so that a more detailed analysis of VOT could be conducted. The results of the analyses for all recordings (across six years) shows that YS’s L1 Japanese VOT values and L2 English VOT values are different in length and that there is no evidence of change or attrition in her VOT values for /p/, /t/ and /k/ in L2 English.

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Modern Languages and Linguistics to host GASLA 14 conference

CLLEAR

The Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) in Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton will be hosting the 14th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition conference (GASLA 14) on 7-9 April 2017.

The conference provides a forum for discussion of recent, high quality research on second language acquisition, bilingual and multilingual acquisition, psycholinguistics and neurocognition. GASLA brings together researchers working on the nature, use, and development of interlanguage in all contexts of bilingual and multilingual acquisition. GASLA 14 will include, in addition to the main session, a special session on the linguistic input and its interaction with representation and processing.

Find out more on the conference website.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th March 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach” and will be delivered by Miguel Pérez-Milans, Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics from the Department of Culture, Communication and Media, UCL Institute of Education, University College London. All welcome! Read more…

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Language learners abroad: Making the most of a multilingual experience”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th February 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Language learners abroad: Making the most of a multilingual experience” and will be delivered by Professor Ros Mitchell, Laurence Richard and Dr Patricia Romero de Mills from the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The “year abroad” has been central to modern languages undergraduate programmes in British universities, yet its future is currently uncertain. This talk will present the main findings of the LANGSNAP project, which investigated language learning among students of French and Spanish during and following their sojourn abroad. The positive language learning outcomes experienced by all students, but in varying degrees, are related to their sociocultural experience (social networking, language use, and personal development). There will be a particular focus on case studies of “high gain” students, and the personal and contextual factors which promoted their language learning in complex multilingual and intercultural settings. Research-based conclusions will be drawn for the future management of study abroad programmes, including student preparation and follow up activities.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 11th January 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development” and will be delivered by Professor Monika Schmid from the University of Essex. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Bilinguals are not, as François Grosjean so famously pointed out, “two monolinguals in one person”. They use language differently from monolinguals, they differ from them in terms of processing, of acquisition, in their performance on controlled tasks and so on. We know this to be true, and yet it does not seem to have informed our research to the degree that it should: When we try to assess proficiency levels, probe underlying representations, investigate language production or processing, and so on, among L2 users – we still tend to compare them, as far as possible, to a monolingual reference group. Does it make sense to compare two groups that we know a priori to be different in order to find out that they are indeed different?

I will argue that in order to answer some of the most pressing questions in bilingualism research nowadays, such as whether language acquisition in childhood is qualitatively or merely quantitatively different from language acquisition later in life, we should invoke L1 attrition as part of the bilingual equation. We can thus put the populations that we compare on an equal footing with respect to their being bilinguals. In other words, we should not compare monolinguals and bilinguals, but dominant and non-dominant languages. In the case of L1 attriters, the non-dominant language is the one which was acquired as the first and only language in childhood (and was thus not subject to any maturational constraints). In the case of L2 learners, the non-dominant language (ie., the language that we are interested in) was acquired later in life, after the first language had been established.

Such a comparison has the potential of separating those linguistic factors that are vulnerable to cross-linguistic interference in both early- and late-learned languages (and on which both populations differ from monolingual controls) from those that might indeed have been affected by some kind of a Critical Period (which are stable in attriters but variable in L2 speakers).

I will illustrate this argument with data from a number of ongoing investigations, using behavioral measures, free speech data and evidence from neuroimaging studies.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “That’s what she said – a sociophonetic investigation of class and gender in southeast England”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 16th November 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “That’s what she said – a sociophonetic investigation of class and gender in southeast England” and will be delivered by Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott from Modern Languages here at the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous work on /s/ variation in English has suggested that, for a number of varieties, backer, more [ʃ] like variants are associated with men (e.g. Essex sounds like Eshex) while more fronted realisations are associated with women, and, in some varieties, also gay men (e.g., Munson et al 2006). Subsequent work in the UK has also indicated that for some speakers /s/ may also be associated with class (Stuart-Smith, 2007).

We took data from British reality television in order to investigate this further. We selected two shows – Made in Chelsea and The Only Way is Essex – and used the different programmes as a proxy for social class (upper middle class Chelsea versus working class Essex). Our initial analysis showed that while women consistently showed fronter /s/ measures, the magnitude of the difference was much greater in Essex than Chelsea. Furthermore, this difference was driven primarily by the Essex females. But why, to borrow from Eckert (1989), were the Essex girls “putting these phonological resources to better use than the boys”? What does this phonological resource signify to these speakers?

In order to attempt to tackle this question we analysed the variation in its conversational context (Brown & Levinson, 1987; Kiesling, 2009). For instance, do different speech activities elicit systematically different articulations of /s/? In other words, do Essex girls use fronter /s/ articulations when they are gossiping and aligning with their friends, as in (1), compared to when they are confronting and challenging their boyfriends, as in (2)?
(1) It was so funny right, he was like “I love this girl so much” and everyone was like “aw” and I was like “oh my gosh, Mark is being really emotional” (Lydia, TOWIE:32)
(2) Hate you so much James, just fucked up my life so much (Lydia, TOWIE:27)

Our findings show that they do – particular interactional types are associated with fronter /s/ productions. I discuss these findings in light of what they may contribute to our understanding of socially constrained variation and how linguistic variables develop socially symbolic meanings.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Humpty-Dumpty’s Problem: how do we put morphologically complex words back together again?”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 19th October 2016 from 4:00-6:00pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Humpty-Dumpty’s Problem: how do we put morphologically complex words back together again?” and will be delivered by Dr Linnaea Stockall from Queen Mary University of London. All welcome! Read more…

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Upcoming Modern Languages/CLLEAR seminars

CLLEAR

Modern Languages and the Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) are pleased to be hosting a visit from Dr. Elisabet Pladevall Baluster from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in July, who will be offering two seminars focusing on bilingualism and on CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning). The first seminar will take place on Tuesday 26th July at 4pm (65/1095) and is entitled “L1 Use and Focus on Form in a co-taught CLIL programme”. The second seminar will take place on Thursday 28th July at 4pm (65/1097) and is entitled “Developmental asynchrony in the acquisition of subject properties in child L2 English and Spanish”. Read more…

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