Modern Languages and Linguistics outreach events this week

Modern Languages and Linguistics will be hosting two Outreach events this week as part of our commitment to engage with local secondary schools. On Wednesday 13th June, 120 Year 8 pupils will join us at Avenue Campus for a day full activities based on the Wearable Technology theme and language taster sessions in the afternoon when pupils will have the chance to try a new language.

On Thursday 14th June we will have 140 Year 10 pupils attending our Study Day: the theme is music and foreign language learning.

The events have sold out after only one day of being advertised, confirming the enormous interest and strong links between the University of Southampton and local schools.

Next CLLEAR seminar: Methodological considerations in measuring ambiguous relative clause attachment strategies in bilinguals

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Monday 16th April 2018 at 15:30 in Room 1011, Building 67, Highfield Campus. The talk is entitled “Methodological considerations in measuring ambiguous relative clause attachment strategies in bilinguals” and will be delivered by Elena Valenzuela from the University of Ottawa. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
It has been argued that monolinguals and bilinguals differ in how they resolve ambiguities in relative clause attachment. Cuetos and Mitchell (1988) first noted that sentences as in (1) and (2), which contain a complex NP of the type “NP of NP” followed by a relative clause (RC), are parsed differently depending on the language:
(1) She kissed the brother(NP1) of the poet(NP2) that was on the balcony.
(2) Elle a embrassé le frère(NP1) du poète(NP2) qui était sur la balcon.
In English (1), the poet is on the balcony whereas in the same sentence in French (2), it is the brother who is on the balcony. Languages can be grouped according to the parsing strategy for monolinguals: high attachment (Spanish, French, Greek, Italian, Japanese, etc.) and low attachment (English, Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Romanian, etc.).

Dussias and Sagarra (2007) found that language dominance was the Spanish-dominant bilinguals with limited exposure to English preferred high attachment in both languages, while bilinguals with extensive exposure to English preferred low attachment in both English and Spanish. Valenzuela et al. (2015) examined the parsing strategies of bilinguals in code-switched sentences and also found that language dominance and exposure played the greatest role for parsing. However, in these previous studies, participants were all living in an English environment at the time of testing which may have influenced so-called language dominance. In our study we test French/English bilinguals living their dominant language environment.
This research examines parsing strategies in monolingual and code-switched sentences to address the following research questions:
i. Does language dominance play a role in parsing strategies?
ii. Does direction of the language code-switch affect processing?
iii. Does the direction of the language code-switch affect processing differently based on individual’s language dominance?

Two groups of bilinguals: French/English living in English dominant environment (n=15) and French/English living in French dominant environment (n=14) were tested on their parsing strategies of French, English, and French/English code-switched ambiguous relative clauses. Participants were given two experimental tasks: Sentence Judgment Task and Sentence Completion Task. Results show that across the board low attachment was preferred regardless of the language environment and language dominance of the participant. This may suggest that, as in Dussias and Sagarra (2007), language exposure plays an important role. However, this may also be due to the prolonged language contact situation in Canada resulting in an emerging dialect. Results will be discussed in terms of language dominance, frequency of language usage, and appropriateness of the methodology used.

Call for papers extended – BAAL Language Learning and Teach SIG, July 2018

CLLEAR
University of Southampton

BAAL
The deadline for submitting a propsal to “Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes”, the BAAL SIG running on 12th-13th July 2018, has now been extended to Wednesday 21st March. You can find out more about the event from our previous blog post.

Second call for papers – 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching SIG

CLLEAR
University of Southampton

BAAL

“Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes” – the 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching Special Interest Group

12 & 13 July 2018

Hosted by the Centre for Language Learning, Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

Proposal deadline is Friday 16th March 2018

CONFERENCE THEME: “Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes”

The theme of the LLT SIG conference at Southampton in 2018 will enable participants to discuss the challenges offered to traditional language education policy and practice by increasing interconnected globalization and changing conceptions of identity, accompanied by a rise in global migratory flows, resurgent nationalism and social inequality. These challenges have both foreseen and unforeseen consequences for the development and implementation of language education policy, and for teaching, learning and assessment practices. We invite papers and posters which make a contribution to understanding the issues which arise in the pre-school, school, and university language curriculum, in community-based and online learning and teaching contexts, and in the evaluation and management processes which shape language education experiences.

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

Abstracts are invited on any aspect of language teaching and learning, based on research in Applied Linguistics or related perspectives on language education. Abstracts which address the conference theme, and which relate to lesser taught languages, such as Chinese, will be particularly welcome.
Proposals are invited for paper presentations of 20 minutes + 5 minutes for questions. Poster proposals are also welcome. A title + abstract of maximum 250 words should be submitted. Abstracts should report original research and profile the context, objectives, method(s), and results of your study.
All proposals should be submitted by 16 March 2018 here.

Next CLLEAR seminar: Swearing in English L1 and LX: the effect of situational, psychological and sociobiographical variables

CLLEARThe next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 21st February 2018 at 17:00 in Lecture Theatre C (Room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Swearing in English L1 and LX: the effect of situational, psychological and sociobiographical variables” and will be delivered by Jean-Marc Dewaele from Birkbeck, University of London. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
An analysis of data collected from 2347 users of English on their self-reported swearing behaviour in English revealed significant differences between the 1159 native English (L1) users and the 1165 English foreign language (LX) users. Parallel analyses on the data of the L1 and LX users revealed that swearing frequency was differentially linked to the type of interlocutor. Participants’ personality traits (Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism) and sociobiographical variables (education level, age group, gender) were also linked to swearing in English. Analysis of 30 mildly negative to extremely negative emotion-laden words showed that LX users overestimated the offensiveness of most words, with the exception of the most offensive one in the list. Variation among LX users was linked to having (or not) lived in English-speaking environments, to context of acquisition and to self-perceived level of proficiency in English LX.

Call for papers – 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching Special Interest Group

CLLEAR
University of Southampton

BAAL

“Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes” – the 14th Annual Conference of the BAAL Language Learning and Teaching Special Interest Group

12 & 13 July 2018

Hosted by the Centre for Language Learning, Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL), University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Fiona Copland – University of Stirling
John Gray – UCL Institute of Education
Tony Liddicoat – University of Warwick

CONFERENCE THEME: “Language teaching and learning in unstable times, and in changing political landscapes”

The theme of the LLT SIG conference at Southampton in 2018 will enable participants to discuss the challenges offered to traditional language education policy and practice by increasing interconnected globalization and changing conceptions of identity, accompanied by a rise in global migratory flows, resurgent nationalism and social inequality. These challenges have both foreseen and unforeseen consequences for the development and implementation of language education policy, and for teaching, learning and assessment practices. We invite papers and posters which make a contribution to understanding the issues which arise in the pre-school, school, and university language curriculum, in community-based and online learning and teaching contexts, and in the evaluation and management processes which shape language education experiences.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Abstracts are invited on any aspect of language teaching and learning, based on research in Applied Linguistics or related perspectives on language education. Abstracts which address the conference theme, and which relate to lesser taught languages, such as Chinese, will be particularly welcome.
Proposals are invited for paper presentations of 20 minutes + 5 minutes for questions. Poster proposals are also welcome. A title + abstract of maximum 250 words should be submitted. Abstracts should report original research and profile the context, objectives, method(s), and results of your study.
All proposals should be submitted by 16 March 2018 here.

SCHOLARSHIPS

A small number of scholarships covering the conference fee and accommodation are available for student presenters. To apply, please complete the scholarship field on the abstract submission page.
Notifications of the acceptance of abstracts will be sent out by 16 April 2018, and those awarded scholarships will be informed by 23 April 2018.

CONFERENCE FEES

BAAL Members: £160
Non-BAAL Members: £185
Students/Unwaged(Baal members and non-members): £135
The conference fee includes: registration, teas/coffees, and lunch.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
You can register for the conference, and book accommodation on campus for campus for 1 or 2 nights (£42 per night), and the conference dinner at St Mary’s football stadium (£50, including transport) at the University of Southampton Online Store.

For further general information please visit the conference website, and follow our latest updates through our Facebook group and Twitter account.
Specific questions and inquiries can be submitted to E.M.Forward@soton.ac.uk.
Conference co-chairs: Richard Kiely and Julia Huettner, Centre for Language Learning, Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR), Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL), University of Southampton.
Conference administrator: Erin Forward

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Study suggests different written languages are equally efficient at conveying meaning

The results of a recent study, led by the University of Southampton, suggest that despite the difference in the forms of different languages, native speakers of those languages can read passages in a comparable amount of time to each other. The languages used for the experiment were English, Finnish and Mandarin Chinese.

Find out more details about the experiment on the University of Southampton news page.