Tag Archives: lecture

Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.

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Next CGE seminar: Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?’ and will be led by Dr Sonia Morán Panero from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I explore how university students from the Spanish-speaking world conceptualise and evaluate the notion of English as a global language, and the variability emerging from its unprecedented spread and lingua franca use. Drawing from a qualitative interview study of students’ elicited metalanguage in Chile, Mexico and Spain, I report on a) the functions and social meanings that are assigned to English between global and local spheres of use, b) students’ conceptualisations and evaluations of their own and others’ ways of speaking, and c) participants’ ideas on what the use of English as a lingua franca is/should be like in relation to intelligibility, correctness, variability and identity expression. The investigation reveals the multiple and often conflicted conceptualisations with which participants construct their evaluations, and the diverse possibilities for identification that these ‘non-native’ users of English find in the language. It also illustrates how broader language ideologies (e.g. native-speaker, standard, variation-friendly ideologies) can be reproduced, re-negotiated and/or challenged in metalinguistic practice. I will reflect on the implications that the observed ontological complexity can have for ELT, and consider the pedagogical opportunities that explicit talk about language has to offer for the language classroom.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 11th January 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development” and will be delivered by Professor Monika Schmid from the University of Essex. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Bilinguals are not, as François Grosjean so famously pointed out, “two monolinguals in one person”. They use language differently from monolinguals, they differ from them in terms of processing, of acquisition, in their performance on controlled tasks and so on. We know this to be true, and yet it does not seem to have informed our research to the degree that it should: When we try to assess proficiency levels, probe underlying representations, investigate language production or processing, and so on, among L2 users – we still tend to compare them, as far as possible, to a monolingual reference group. Does it make sense to compare two groups that we know a priori to be different in order to find out that they are indeed different?

I will argue that in order to answer some of the most pressing questions in bilingualism research nowadays, such as whether language acquisition in childhood is qualitatively or merely quantitatively different from language acquisition later in life, we should invoke L1 attrition as part of the bilingual equation. We can thus put the populations that we compare on an equal footing with respect to their being bilinguals. In other words, we should not compare monolinguals and bilinguals, but dominant and non-dominant languages. In the case of L1 attriters, the non-dominant language is the one which was acquired as the first and only language in childhood (and was thus not subject to any maturational constraints). In the case of L2 learners, the non-dominant language (ie., the language that we are interested in) was acquired later in life, after the first language had been established.

Such a comparison has the potential of separating those linguistic factors that are vulnerable to cross-linguistic interference in both early- and late-learned languages (and on which both populations differ from monolingual controls) from those that might indeed have been affected by some kind of a Critical Period (which are stable in attriters but variable in L2 speakers).

I will illustrate this argument with data from a number of ongoing investigations, using behavioral measures, free speech data and evidence from neuroimaging studies.

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Next CGE seminar: Communicating across online and offline spaces: a mobile-supported business model for migrant micro-entrepreneurs

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 7th December 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, “Communicating across online and offline spaces: a mobile-supported business model for migrant micro-entrepreneurs” and will be led by Dr Caroline Tagg from The Open University. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I draw on data from a large ethnographic project to explore the ways in which migrant small-business owners exploit mobile phone messaging apps to do business, establish and maintain informal support networks, and perform identities as entrepreneurs of a particular heritage background. The project is the AHRC-funded, four-year ‘Translation and Translanguaging: investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in superdiverse wards in four UK cites’ (PI: Angela Creese, University of Birmingham). Key participants are observed, recorded and interviewed at work and home, a well-established ethnographic approach which is innovatively augmented by the parallel collection of social media data.

My talk focuses on the social media use of two entrepreneurial couples: Chinese butchers in Birmingham and Polish shop-owners in London. Analysis of their SMS, WeChat and Viber messages, informed by the interview and interactional data collected at work and home, shows that mobile messaging apps are facilitating the emergence of a new business model characterised by dynamic configurations of time and space. I detail how the mobile phone serves as a gateway to physical contexts such as the shop whilst also facilitating asynchronous communication which we describe as a ‘virtual noticeboard’. I also explore how the mobile makes possible the creation of a support network which stretches from the surrounding UK city to the migrants’ home countries, and how the migrants draw on different timescales – immediate concerns and shared cultural histories – in managing these relationships. In documenting this new model, I explore the ways in which the entrepreneurs construct, negotiate and exploit multiple layers of flexible and selective ‘timespaces’, transgressing traditional boundaries of time and space and creating new intersections between virtual and physical space as they fulfil everyday functions.

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Public lecture: Migrants and Refugees in Europe

Public Lecture

Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton will be speaking at a public lecture on the theme of ‘Migrants and Refugees in Europe’, taking place on Thursday 8th December 2016 at 5:45pm, Building 54/4011, Highfield Campus. His talk is entitled ‘Refugee Camps and their Legacy: France and the Spanish Civil War Exiles’. Also speaking at this event are Professor David Owen (Department of Politics and International Relations), on ‘What Makes a Refugee Crisis?’ and Dr Hedvig Schmidt (Southampton Law School), whose talk is entitled ‘The Free Movement Rights for Migrants and Refugees under EU Law’.

Refreshments will be provided after the event and there will be the opportunity to speak to the Southampton and Winchester Visitors Group who befriend and support asylum seekers and refugees in the Southampton area. The tickets are free but everyone who would like to come needs to register on Eventbrite.

Here are some further details about this event:

The unfolding refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe has laid bare how European states and publics relate to people in desperate circumstances when they are from a country that is not their own. European states have tried to find ways to cope with the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people, either by agreeing on a number they will take on, by closing border and building fences, or by criminalising those fleeing, or just focusing on people smugglers, rather than supporting those whose rights are violated on a massive scale. The public, meanwhile, is either misinformed by biased tabloid press or by organisations suggesting that handouts are the solution. Key questions emerge about how to address the influx of refugees, asylum-seekers and economic migrants in Europe. What are the responsibilities of European governments and societies in relation to the refugee crisis? How can the refugee/migrant crisis be better tackled? What alternative solutions exist? What are most effective legal and policy interventions that can protect the rights of refugees and asylum-seekers in Europe? What can history teach us about past refugee/migrant crisis and how European societies dealt with them? These are some of the crucial questions that this public lecture will attempt to tackle.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “That’s what she said – a sociophonetic investigation of class and gender in southeast England”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 16th November 2016 from 4:30-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “That’s what she said – a sociophonetic investigation of class and gender in southeast England” and will be delivered by Dr Sophie Holmes-Elliott from Modern Languages here at the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous work on /s/ variation in English has suggested that, for a number of varieties, backer, more [ʃ] like variants are associated with men (e.g. Essex sounds like Eshex) while more fronted realisations are associated with women, and, in some varieties, also gay men (e.g., Munson et al 2006). Subsequent work in the UK has also indicated that for some speakers /s/ may also be associated with class (Stuart-Smith, 2007).

We took data from British reality television in order to investigate this further. We selected two shows – Made in Chelsea and The Only Way is Essex – and used the different programmes as a proxy for social class (upper middle class Chelsea versus working class Essex). Our initial analysis showed that while women consistently showed fronter /s/ measures, the magnitude of the difference was much greater in Essex than Chelsea. Furthermore, this difference was driven primarily by the Essex females. But why, to borrow from Eckert (1989), were the Essex girls “putting these phonological resources to better use than the boys”? What does this phonological resource signify to these speakers?

In order to attempt to tackle this question we analysed the variation in its conversational context (Brown & Levinson, 1987; Kiesling, 2009). For instance, do different speech activities elicit systematically different articulations of /s/? In other words, do Essex girls use fronter /s/ articulations when they are gossiping and aligning with their friends, as in (1), compared to when they are confronting and challenging their boyfriends, as in (2)?
(1) It was so funny right, he was like “I love this girl so much” and everyone was like “aw” and I was like “oh my gosh, Mark is being really emotional” (Lydia, TOWIE:32)
(2) Hate you so much James, just fucked up my life so much (Lydia, TOWIE:27)

Our findings show that they do – particular interactional types are associated with fronter /s/ productions. I discuss these findings in light of what they may contribute to our understanding of socially constrained variation and how linguistic variables develop socially symbolic meanings.

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Next CGE seminar: Research to classroom practice: Global Englishes and ELT textbooks

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 9th November 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Research to classroom practice: Global Englishes and ELT textbooks’ and will be led by Dr Nicola Galloway from the University of Edinburgh. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
“the prevailing orientation in…..ELT materials still remains undoubtedly towards ENL” (Jenkins, 2012: 487).
Theoretical and empirical work within the field of Global Englishes raises crucial questions about established modes of practice in the ELT profession. The pedagogical implications of such research have been attracting an increasing amount of attention in recent years, yet little attention has been placed on ELT materials specifically. In order to create pedagogical change within the field of ELT, we need to look at various aspects of the learning and teaching process: “it is not enough to simply say that ELF has implications for pedagogy” (Dewey, 2012: 143). ELT materials are a central part of the learning and teaching process; they provide language input and are often used to determine the syllabus. The continued orientation towards native English, as outlined by Jenkins (2012) above, clearly warrants serious attention. This presentation examines current textbooks, which have been identified as one of the main barriers to Global Englishes Language Teaching (GELT) (Galloway, 2011; Galloway and Rose, 2015). A central thesis of this talk focuses on the need to ensure that 21st century ELT is effective in preparing learners to use ELF in global contexts. It examines recent trends in the field of ELT, proposing that the on-going quest for new approaches and methods be accompanied with a quest for new conceptualisations of the very subject matter in such materials; the English language. The talk ends with a proposed framework to help ELT practitioners adopt and develop materials that offer more than a mere superficial awareness of Global Englishes.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Humpty-Dumpty’s Problem: how do we put morphologically complex words back together again?”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 19th October 2016 from 4:00-6:00pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Humpty-Dumpty’s Problem: how do we put morphologically complex words back together again?” and will be delivered by Dr Linnaea Stockall from Queen Mary University of London. All welcome! Read more…

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Next MeXsu seminar: “Popular music and migration in the northeast of Mexico. Circuits and conjunctures in a transnational context.”

Mexsu

The next Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 20th April 2016, in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Popular music and migration in the northeast of Mexico. Circuits and conjunctures in a transnational context’ and will be presented by Dr José Juan Olvera Gudiño (CIESAS Unidad Noreste, Monterrey, Mexico). All welcome! Please note that this paper will be presented in Spanish (with Powerpoint slides in English). Translators will be on hand for questions.

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
This paper will provide a sociological perspective on popular music and migration in the northeast of Mexico and the south of Texas. It will analyze and reflect on: a) differentiated circuits of migration (regional and bi-national), and particular socio-cultural dynamics; b) how these human mobilities combine with the cultural industries and their impact on the configuration of musical cultures in the Northeast; c) the specificity of place in understanding these dynamics. I explore this with three cases drawing on empirical work I have conducted over the last two decades: the ‘Colombian music of Monterrey’, conjunto norteño music (accordion and bajo sexto) and rap music.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Experiencing master’s dissertation supervision: two supervisors’ perspectives”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 16th March 2016 from 4:00-6:00pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Experiencing master’s dissertation supervision: two supervisors’ perspectives” and will be delivered by Dr Nigel Harwood from the University of Sheffield. All welcome! Read more…

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