Tag Archives: modern languages

Modern Languages graduation today!

Graduation

Many of our new graduates in Modern Languages are attending Summer Graduation at the University of Southampton today, and are graduating alongside other students from the Faculty of Humanities.

Many congratulations to all of our new graduates! Don’t forget you can keep in touch with the University via the Southampton Alumni Facebook page or on Twitter @UniSotonAlumni.

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Southampton launches new EMI MOOC

EMI MOOC

Modern Languages and Linguistics in collaboration with the Academic Centre for International Students (ACIS) at the University of Southampton launches its new MOOC on English as Medium of Instruction (EMI) today (Monday 26th June 2017).

As a course participant, you will learn about current EMI practice, increase your confidence in using English, and work to grow your intercultural skills. We are looking forward to welcoming more than 1200 learners to the course today and sharing our thoughts and experiences about EMI.

Find out more about the course and how to sign up on the course FutureLearn page.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” – SEMINAR CANCELLED

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 17th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” and will be delivered by Professor Alessandro Benati from the University of Greenwich. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The present study explores the effects of structured input and structured output when delivered in isolation or in combination on the acquisition of the English causative. Research investigating the effects of processing instruction and meaning output-based instruction has provided some interesting and sometimes conflicting results. Additionally, there are a number of issues (e.g., measuring a combination of structured input and structured output, measuring discourse-level effects) that have not been fully and clearly addressed. To provide answers to the questions formulated in this study, two classroom experiments were carried out. In the first study, fifty-four Chinese university students (age 18-20) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to four groups: structured input only group (n=13); structured output only group (n=15); combined structured input and structured output group (n=16); control group (n=10). In the second study, thirty school-age Greek learners (age 10-12) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups: structured input only group (n=10); structured output only group (n=10); combined structured input and structured output group (n=10).

Only subjects who participated in all phases of each experiment and scored lower than 60% in the pre-tests were included in the final data collection. Instruction lasted for three hours. The control group received no instruction on the causative structure. Interpretation and production tasks were used in a pre-test and post-test design. The design included a delayed post-test battery (3 weeks after instruction) for both experiments. In the first study, the assessment tasks included an interpretation and production task at sentence-level, and an interpretation task at discourse-level. In the second study, an additional discourse-level production task was adopted along with the interpretation discourse-level task. The results indicated that learners who received structured input both in isolation and in combination benefitted more than learners receiving structured output only. These two groups were able to retain instructional gains three weeks later in all assessment measures.

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Next TNS seminar: “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 3rd May 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”. The seminar will be presented by Ulrike Hanna Meinhof. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

My paper is based on my current experiences with an AHRC Follow-on-project: Madagascar in the world: the impact of music on global concerns. The project proposed to put the results of my previously AHRC-funded project TNMundi (2006-2010) into the popular and widely accessible form of a full-length music documentary, directed by Cesar Paes, an award-winning film director of the Parisian independent film company Laterit.

The film was completed in the autumn of 2016 and has so far been screened at various international film festivals and special screenings in the UK, Italy, and on La Reunion.

Each screening was accompanied by a questionnaire in the respective languages gauging audience reactions. Apart from wanting feed-back about the kind of audience the film attracted at each of these diverse sites in terms of age, gender, and origin and on how they responded to the artistic and musical quality of the film, there were some closed and some open questions on the themes and social concerns raised by the film and by the musicians in its centre.

My own previous narrative interviews and transnational field work with these Malagasy musicians had highlighted their transnational mobility, their attempt to challenge ethnic divisions by their music and to engage people worldwide in environmental and social causes. In my paper I will give a few examples of these and subsequently show a few key extracts of the film where the director in my view tried to raise these issues by the very indirect and subtle means of the film.

A brief assessment of some of the results of the questionnaires will lead to a discussion about some of the issues raised by replacing or complementing an academic top-down analysis in favour of a much more intuitive artistic format.

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Modern Languages and Linguistics welcomes potential future students for visit day

Get Ready for Languages

Today Modern Languages and Linguistics is welcoming 17 languages students and their guests for a visit day at Avenue Campus. Participants will have opportunities to meet Modern Languages staff and students, and find out more about Modern Languages study at Southampton.

Our visitors may be interested to take a look at Get Ready for Languages, an online resource which aims to guide you to useful information about life as a Modern Languages student at Southampton. You can read about staff in the Modern Languages department, discover what sorts of things Modern Languages students past and present are getting up to, and explore some of the modules you might decide to do. All this and more!

Why not also follow us here on the Languages at Southampton blog, and on Twitter @ModernLangs, to keep updated on Modern Languages news and events. We welcome all our visitors and hope you enjoy your time here!

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Happy Easter from Languages at Southampton!

Easter at Avenue

Wishing all followers of our Languages at Southampton blog: students, staff and friends of Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton, a very happy and enjoyable Easter break!

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Modern Languages and Linguistics to host GASLA 14 conference

CLLEAR

The Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) in Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton will be hosting the 14th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition conference (GASLA 14) on 7-9 April 2017.

The conference provides a forum for discussion of recent, high quality research on second language acquisition, bilingual and multilingual acquisition, psycholinguistics and neurocognition. GASLA brings together researchers working on the nature, use, and development of interlanguage in all contexts of bilingual and multilingual acquisition. GASLA 14 will include, in addition to the main session, a special session on the linguistic input and its interaction with representation and processing.

Find out more on the conference website.

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Modern Languages and Linguistics to host workshop on eye tracking in linguistics

eye tracking

Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton is hosting an all-day workshop on Tuesday 28th March 2017 from 10:30 – 17:00 in Room 2129, Building 65, Avenue Campus, focusing on the use eye tracking in linguistics with particular emphasis on its use in sociolinguistics. The workshop will be run by Dr Duncan Robertson from the University of York and is open to University of Southampton staff and students, linguists and non-linguists.

This hands-on workshop aims to provide an introduction to eye tracking for sociolinguistic perception studies. This will include:
– an introductory presentation on Visual World eye tracking experiments;
– a tutorial detailing how to build an eye tracking experiment in Open Sesame (Python-based experiment building software);
– a tutorial on analysing eye tracking data using the ‘eyetrackingR’ package for R

All software used is open source and available for download on the following links:
http://osdoc.cogsci.nl/3.1/
https://www.r-project.org/
http://www.eyetracking-r.com/#installation

The workshop is free but spaces may be limited. If you would like to attend the workshop, please register using this form.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th March 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Reflexive language and ethnic minority activism in Hong Kong: A linguistic anthropological approach” and will be delivered by Miguel Pérez-Milans, Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics from the Department of Culture, Communication and Media, UCL Institute of Education, University College London. All welcome! Read more…

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Modern Languages and Linguistics seminar – “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis”

Modern Languages and Linguistics is hosting a seminar on Wednesday 15th March from 16:00-17:00 in Room 1097, Building 65, Avenue Campus, entitled “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis.” The seminar will be presented by Dr Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún from Middlesex University. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Join Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún (Middlesex University London) on a dérive through the atmospheric streets of Tunis. Together we will negotiate our way through the forest of signs that make up the linguistic landscape of the city. The façades of both the colonial ville nouvelle and the Kasbah are resplendent with public lettering and typography in French, Arabic and other languages, a linguistic landscape that reveals much about the multilayered processes of identity construction and the politics of language in post-colonial Tunisia. As we travel by tram, light railway and wander the backstreets on foot, we will have the chance to think about aspects of the city’s history, Tunis’s contribution to post-colonial thought and the troubling questions that arise when a European takes it upon himself to interpret the visual culture of a North African cityscape.

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