CGE Research Seminar on Wednesday 6th February: Ecological perspectives on researching multilingually: foregrounding and problematising language in an era of English-dominated scholarship

CGEThe next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 5th February 2019 from 5:00pm in Lecture Theatre C (room 1175), Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar will be presented by Richard Fay from the Manchester Institute of Education at the University of Manchester and is entitled “Ecological perspectives on researching multilingually: foregrounding and problematising language in an era of English-dominated scholarship”. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, with reference to a series of AHRC-funded research projects, and mindful of the Anglo-centric pressures within much global academic publishing, I will explore the area of research practice we term Researching Multilingually (RM-ly) and present an ecologically-framed analysis of researcher praxis vis-à-vis RM-ly. I will present these inter-related research projects and, in doing so, explore how the understanding of RM-ly has shifted over the years. In particular, there has been a move from:
a) foregrounding languages in research – exploring researcher thinking and practice regarding the use of multiple languages in research (in an institutional and global context of English-dominated research); to
b) problematising the languaging of research – exploring researcher praxis regarding their languaging of research.
By the end, I will raise a number of proposals relating to researcher education, research governance, and epistemic justice.

Next TNS Seminar: ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences?’

Impact

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 25th November 2015 in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The session is entitled ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences’. The discussion of this topic will be introduced by short presentations of three authors of impact studies in the last REF: Professor Wrigley from Geography, Professor Jon Adams from Archaeology and Professor Ulrike Meinhof from Modern Languages. All welcome!

Modern Languages eLearning Group launched

ML eLearning Group badgeModern Languages has launched a new eLearning Group. The Group has a blog which will feature the eLearning projects that our staff are engaged in, and report on our wide-ranging research and publications in this area. Some of the subjects being covered include the TwitTIAMO Project; Get Ready for Languages; free Digital Literacies learning resources, an Understanding Language: Learning and Teaching MOOC; our online MA in ELT programme and blogging from abroad.

If you would like to be notified of regular blog updates please follow us on Twitter @ModernLangs or subscribe to the RSS feed on the eLearning Group blog.

See more details at the Modern Languages eLearning Group blog.

Mother tongue languages spoken in early years have lasting impact on the brain

According to research findings discussed in a recent article in the Independent, mother tongue languages spoken at an early age and then ‘forgotten’ are retained by the brain through neural pathways that remain intact. This could be good news for individuals looking to re-learn a language from their infancy.

To read the article in full, visit the Independent website.

Learning a language can increase the size of your brain

The Guardian has published an article discussing recent research undertaken by scientists at Lund University in Sweden, which has shown that learning a language can increase the size of your brain. The researchers used brain scans on adult military recruits learning Arabic, Russian or Dari intensively to monitor changes in the brain during the language learning process.

To read more about the research, visit the Guardian website.

Learning a language has a positive effect on the brain

The BBC has reported on recent research showing that learning a second language ‘slows brain ageing’. The study undertaken by researchers from the University of Edinburgh used data from intelligence tests on 262 individuals at the age of 11, and looked at how their cognitive abilities had changed when tested again in their seventies.

This research follows on from another recent study which showed that being bilingual could delay the onset of dementia.

To read the article in full, visit the BBC website.

Workshop by Professor Ute Smit: “Methodological issues in longitudinal ELF research: Focus on educational settings”

Professor Ute Smit, currently visiting from the University of Vienna, will be delivering a workshop on Friday 21st February 2014 in Room 1097, Building 65, Avenue Campus on “Methodological issues in longitudinal ELF research: Focus on educational settings”. The workshop is aimed primarily at PhD students, but is also open to other interested researchers.