Tag Archives: seminar

Next TNS seminar: ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’

TNS

Professor Ben Rampton from King’s College London will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar taking place on 21st June 2017 from 4-6pm in Lecture Theatre C, Avenue Campus. The seminar, entitled ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’, will begin with a 20-25 minute presentation which will be followed by an open discussion.

Professor Ben Rampton’s work involves ethnographic and interactional discourse analysis, cross-referring to work in anthropology, sociology, cultural and security studies. His publications focus on language in relation to urban multilingualism, youth, popular culture, ethnicities, class, (in)securitisation, education, second language learning, and research methodology.

For further details about this event, please visit the Modern Languages and Linguistics website.

Posted in News

Next CLLEAR seminar: “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Thursday 25th May 2017 at 16:00 in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “How the glottal stop starts: examining children’s use of a rapidly expanding variable” and will be delivered by Jennifer Smith from the University of Glasgow and Sophie Holmes-Elliott the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion! Read more…

Posted in News

Next CLLEAR seminar: “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” – SEMINAR CANCELLED

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 17th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “The relative effects of isolated and combined structured input and structured output on the acquisition of the English causative forms” and will be delivered by Professor Alessandro Benati from the University of Greenwich. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The present study explores the effects of structured input and structured output when delivered in isolation or in combination on the acquisition of the English causative. Research investigating the effects of processing instruction and meaning output-based instruction has provided some interesting and sometimes conflicting results. Additionally, there are a number of issues (e.g., measuring a combination of structured input and structured output, measuring discourse-level effects) that have not been fully and clearly addressed. To provide answers to the questions formulated in this study, two classroom experiments were carried out. In the first study, fifty-four Chinese university students (age 18-20) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to four groups: structured input only group (n=13); structured output only group (n=15); combined structured input and structured output group (n=16); control group (n=10). In the second study, thirty school-age Greek learners (age 10-12) participated. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups: structured input only group (n=10); structured output only group (n=10); combined structured input and structured output group (n=10).

Only subjects who participated in all phases of each experiment and scored lower than 60% in the pre-tests were included in the final data collection. Instruction lasted for three hours. The control group received no instruction on the causative structure. Interpretation and production tasks were used in a pre-test and post-test design. The design included a delayed post-test battery (3 weeks after instruction) for both experiments. In the first study, the assessment tasks included an interpretation and production task at sentence-level, and an interpretation task at discourse-level. In the second study, an additional discourse-level production task was adopted along with the interpretation discourse-level task. The results indicated that learners who received structured input both in isolation and in combination benefitted more than learners receiving structured output only. These two groups were able to retain instructional gains three weeks later in all assessment measures.

Posted in News

Next CLLEAR seminar: “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Friday 5th May 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Heritage Language Reversal: The Production of Articles and Voice Onset Time (VOT) by Japanese Returnees” and will be delivered by Dr Neal Snape, Gunma Prefectural Women’s University and Chuo University in Japan. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Previous L2 studies by Shirahata (1995) and Tomiyama (2000) examined L1 Japanese L2 English child returnees suppliance of articles and a range of grammatical morphemes. Shirahata focused on age-related L2 acquisition while Tomiyama was concerned with L2 attrition. Both studies found omission in obligatory contexts, though little evidence of L2 attrition. We adopt a neutral position for our study as both acquisition and attrition are likely to be taking place in heritage language reversal cases. This study examines datasets from two L1 Japanese L2 English speakers. The sibling child returnees were born in Japan and lived 8 years in the U.S. before returning to Japan. The younger child (KS) was exposed to L2 English from 3 years of age and the older child (CS) was first exposed from 12 years of age. Background questionnaires revealed that they have high levels of proficiency in English, based on the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) scores. ‘The Frog Story’ (Mayer, 1979) was administered and the returnees’ narrations were recorded and transcribed. The two participants were compared on their article suppliance to address the following two research questions:
RQ1: Does reduced input limit success in acquisition or lead to attrition over time?
RQ2: Are there any differences between the returnees given the difference in age of acquisition?

Voice Onset Time
This longitudinal study examines whether the decline in exposure to L2 input experienced by YS produces changes in voice onset time (VOT). YS met with researchers six times over the span of six years. Each meeting required YS to complete ‘The Frog Story’ and a picture description task (Goad & White, 2008) to elicit spoken production. Each time YS was recorded using a video camera and an iPod. The recordings of each session were subsequently analyzed in Praat for production of words beginning with voiceless consonants /p/, /t/ and /k/. Once located in the recordings, words were cut out of the original full-length recordings so that a more detailed analysis of VOT could be conducted. The results of the analyses for all recordings (across six years) shows that YS’s L1 Japanese VOT values and L2 English VOT values are different in length and that there is no evidence of change or attrition in her VOT values for /p/, /t/ and /k/ in L2 English.

Posted in News

Next TNS seminar: “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 3rd May 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”. The seminar will be presented by Ulrike Hanna Meinhof. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

My paper is based on my current experiences with an AHRC Follow-on-project: Madagascar in the world: the impact of music on global concerns. The project proposed to put the results of my previously AHRC-funded project TNMundi (2006-2010) into the popular and widely accessible form of a full-length music documentary, directed by Cesar Paes, an award-winning film director of the Parisian independent film company Laterit.

The film was completed in the autumn of 2016 and has so far been screened at various international film festivals and special screenings in the UK, Italy, and on La Reunion.

Each screening was accompanied by a questionnaire in the respective languages gauging audience reactions. Apart from wanting feed-back about the kind of audience the film attracted at each of these diverse sites in terms of age, gender, and origin and on how they responded to the artistic and musical quality of the film, there were some closed and some open questions on the themes and social concerns raised by the film and by the musicians in its centre.

My own previous narrative interviews and transnational field work with these Malagasy musicians had highlighted their transnational mobility, their attempt to challenge ethnic divisions by their music and to engage people worldwide in environmental and social causes. In my paper I will give a few examples of these and subsequently show a few key extracts of the film where the director in my view tried to raise these issues by the very indirect and subtle means of the film.

A brief assessment of some of the results of the questionnaires will lead to a discussion about some of the issues raised by replacing or complementing an academic top-down analysis in favour of a much more intuitive artistic format.

Posted in News

Next TNS seminar: “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”. The seminar will be presented by Jenny Cuffe and Henrietta Nleya. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

‘I believe that there is no more real or more realistic way of exploring communication in general than by focussing on the simultaneously practical and theoretical problems that emerge from the particular interaction between the investigator and the person being questioned.’ P. Bourdieu ‘The Weight of the World: Social Suffering in Contemporary Society’ (1999, p.607)

The sociologist Pierre Bourdieu reminds us that, although the research relationship is different from other exchanges in everyday life because its objective is pure knowledge, it remains nevertheless a social relationship.

I have invited Henrietta Nleya, a key participant in my doctoral research on the impact of Zimbabwe’s migrant families, to have a conversation with me about our ‘particular interaction’ and the relationship we built.

The nature of transnational family research means that I relied on Henrietta not only to tell me her own life story, but also to introduce me to relatives living in Zimbabwe and South Africa. This presented us both with practical and ethical challenges for, although together in Southampton we had time to establish a shared history and ties of trust, I arrived at the homes of her parents and siblings as a prying stranger. And although I guaranteed anonymity in my thesis, I was conscious that family members would have no difficulty recognising each other – with the potential for hurt feelings and even resentment.

This conversation will be the start of an open discussion on relationship-building in the research process, in which you are invited to present questions and problems that have arisen in your own research.

Posted in News

Modern Languages and Linguistics seminar – “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis”

Modern Languages and Linguistics is hosting a seminar on Wednesday 15th March from 16:00-17:00 in Room 1097, Building 65, Avenue Campus, entitled “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis.” The seminar will be presented by Dr Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún from Middlesex University. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Join Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún (Middlesex University London) on a dérive through the atmospheric streets of Tunis. Together we will negotiate our way through the forest of signs that make up the linguistic landscape of the city. The façades of both the colonial ville nouvelle and the Kasbah are resplendent with public lettering and typography in French, Arabic and other languages, a linguistic landscape that reveals much about the multilayered processes of identity construction and the politics of language in post-colonial Tunisia. As we travel by tram, light railway and wander the backstreets on foot, we will have the chance to think about aspects of the city’s history, Tunis’s contribution to post-colonial thought and the troubling questions that arise when a European takes it upon himself to interpret the visual culture of a North African cityscape.

Posted in News

Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.

Posted in News

Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.

Posted in News

Next MeXsu seminar: “Indigenous resistance in contemporary Mexico”

Mexsu

The next Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) seminar will take place on Wednesday 1st March 2017 from 5:15-6:45pm in Building 65 Room 1177 at Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled “Indigenous resistance in contemporary Mexico: The struggle of the Chiapas toques, the National Indigenous Congress and the proposal of an independent candidate to the presidency of the republic in 2018” and will be presented by Fortín Domínguez Rueda from the University of Guadalajara. All welcome! Please note that this talk will be delivered in Spanish. Read more…

Posted in News