Tag Archives: seminar

Modern Languages and Linguistics seminar – “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis”

Modern Languages and Linguistics is hosting a seminar on Wednesday 15th March from 16:00-17:00 in Room 1097, Building 65, Avenue Campus, entitled “Jasmine Letters: a tram journey through the linguistic landscapes of post-colonial Tunis.” The seminar will be presented by Dr Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún from Middlesex University. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Join Bharain Mac an Bhreithiún (Middlesex University London) on a dérive through the atmospheric streets of Tunis. Together we will negotiate our way through the forest of signs that make up the linguistic landscape of the city. The façades of both the colonial ville nouvelle and the Kasbah are resplendent with public lettering and typography in French, Arabic and other languages, a linguistic landscape that reveals much about the multilayered processes of identity construction and the politics of language in post-colonial Tunisia. As we travel by tram, light railway and wander the backstreets on foot, we will have the chance to think about aspects of the city’s history, Tunis’s contribution to post-colonial thought and the troubling questions that arise when a European takes it upon himself to interpret the visual culture of a North African cityscape.

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Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.

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Next CGE seminar: Perspectives on multilingualism

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Perspectives on multilingualism’ and will be chaired by Prof Jennifer Jenkins from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Over the past ten years or so, multilingualism has become a hot topic in linguistics research. Alongside a range of existing and new generative SLA approaches to the subject, a branch of critical multilingualism research, sometimes described as a ‘multilingual turn’, has developed that includes, for example, a focus on issues relating to mobility and migration, a questioning of the constructs ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ speaker, an interest in translanguaging, and a reconceptualisation of ‘English’. In this seminar, speakers from each of our four research centres, CGE, CLLEAR, MeXsu, and TNS, will present what they see as the key aspects of multilingualism from their own research and/or research centre’s position. The seminar will then open up to debate among the panel and discussion between the panel and audience.

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Next MeXsu seminar: “Indigenous resistance in contemporary Mexico”

Mexsu

The next Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) seminar will take place on Wednesday 1st March 2017 from 5:15-6:45pm in Building 65 Room 1177 at Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled “Indigenous resistance in contemporary Mexico: The struggle of the Chiapas toques, the National Indigenous Congress and the proposal of an independent candidate to the presidency of the republic in 2018” and will be presented by Fortín Domínguez Rueda from the University of Guadalajara. All welcome! Please note that this talk will be delivered in Spanish. Read more…

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Next TNS seminar: “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”. The seminar will be presented by Professor Patrick Stevenson from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. All welcome! Read more…

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Language learners abroad: Making the most of a multilingual experience”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 15th February 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Language learners abroad: Making the most of a multilingual experience” and will be delivered by Professor Ros Mitchell, Laurence Richard and Dr Patricia Romero de Mills from the University of Southampton. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The “year abroad” has been central to modern languages undergraduate programmes in British universities, yet its future is currently uncertain. This talk will present the main findings of the LANGSNAP project, which investigated language learning among students of French and Spanish during and following their sojourn abroad. The positive language learning outcomes experienced by all students, but in varying degrees, are related to their sociocultural experience (social networking, language use, and personal development). There will be a particular focus on case studies of “high gain” students, and the personal and contextual factors which promoted their language learning in complex multilingual and intercultural settings. Research-based conclusions will be drawn for the future management of study abroad programmes, including student preparation and follow up activities.

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Next CGE seminar: Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?

CGE

The next Centre for Global Englishes (CGE) seminar will take place on Wednesday 8th February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled, ‘Orientations towards English as a lingua franca in the Spanish-speaking world: What is ‘English’ (for)?’ and will be led by Dr Sonia Morán Panero from the University of Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
In this talk, I explore how university students from the Spanish-speaking world conceptualise and evaluate the notion of English as a global language, and the variability emerging from its unprecedented spread and lingua franca use. Drawing from a qualitative interview study of students’ elicited metalanguage in Chile, Mexico and Spain, I report on a) the functions and social meanings that are assigned to English between global and local spheres of use, b) students’ conceptualisations and evaluations of their own and others’ ways of speaking, and c) participants’ ideas on what the use of English as a lingua franca is/should be like in relation to intelligibility, correctness, variability and identity expression. The investigation reveals the multiple and often conflicted conceptualisations with which participants construct their evaluations, and the diverse possibilities for identification that these ‘non-native’ users of English find in the language. It also illustrates how broader language ideologies (e.g. native-speaker, standard, variation-friendly ideologies) can be reproduced, re-negotiated and/or challenged in metalinguistic practice. I will reflect on the implications that the observed ontological complexity can have for ELT, and consider the pedagogical opportunities that explicit talk about language has to offer for the language classroom.

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MeXsu film screening and seminar: “Hip Hop Revolución” (Documentary)

Mexsu

The next Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) event will be a film screening and seminar, hosted jointly with the Department of Film, which will take place from 5:15-7:00pm on Wednesday 1st February 2017, in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled “Hip Hop Revolución” (Documentary, Alborada Films, 60 mins, 2015) and will be presented by the documentary director, Pablo Navarrete. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
British activist Jody McIntyre travels to Venezuela with UK-Iraqi rapper Lowkey to spend time with ‘Hip Hop Revolución’, a dynamic collective of musical revolutionaries. They witness their inspiring grassroots work and share music and ideas, exploring the cultural and political changes taking place in the country. At its heart, this film is about the power of music, community and the spirit of rebellion.

Pablo Navarrete will be joining us to discuss the film after the screening. He is a British-Chilean journalist and documentary filmmaker. He is the founder and editor of www.alborada.net, a website covering Latin America related issues such as politics, media and culture and is co-editor of Alborada Magazine. Besides directing acclaimed films and work for television, he has co-authored a book on Venezuelan politics and spoken and written on many occasions about Latin American political issues.

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Next CLLEAR seminar: “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development”

CLLEAR

The next Centre for Linguistics, Language Education and Acquisition Research (CLLEAR) seminar will take place on Wednesday 11th January 2017 from 4:00-5:30pm in Lecture Theatre C, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The talk is entitled “Once a native, always a native? Language attrition and constraints on bilingual development” and will be delivered by Professor Monika Schmid from the University of Essex. All welcome for the seminar and discussion!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
Bilinguals are not, as François Grosjean so famously pointed out, “two monolinguals in one person”. They use language differently from monolinguals, they differ from them in terms of processing, of acquisition, in their performance on controlled tasks and so on. We know this to be true, and yet it does not seem to have informed our research to the degree that it should: When we try to assess proficiency levels, probe underlying representations, investigate language production or processing, and so on, among L2 users – we still tend to compare them, as far as possible, to a monolingual reference group. Does it make sense to compare two groups that we know a priori to be different in order to find out that they are indeed different?

I will argue that in order to answer some of the most pressing questions in bilingualism research nowadays, such as whether language acquisition in childhood is qualitatively or merely quantitatively different from language acquisition later in life, we should invoke L1 attrition as part of the bilingual equation. We can thus put the populations that we compare on an equal footing with respect to their being bilinguals. In other words, we should not compare monolinguals and bilinguals, but dominant and non-dominant languages. In the case of L1 attriters, the non-dominant language is the one which was acquired as the first and only language in childhood (and was thus not subject to any maturational constraints). In the case of L2 learners, the non-dominant language (ie., the language that we are interested in) was acquired later in life, after the first language had been established.

Such a comparison has the potential of separating those linguistic factors that are vulnerable to cross-linguistic interference in both early- and late-learned languages (and on which both populations differ from monolingual controls) from those that might indeed have been affected by some kind of a Critical Period (which are stable in attriters but variable in L2 speakers).

I will illustrate this argument with data from a number of ongoing investigations, using behavioral measures, free speech data and evidence from neuroimaging studies.

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Next MeXsu seminar: ‘Volcano activity and other possible natural hazards in Mexico and its impact on the surrounding rural communities and urban settlements’

MeXsu

The next Centre for Mexico-Southampton Collaboration (MeXsu) seminar will take place at 6pm on Friday 16th December 2016, in Room 1177, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled “Volcano activity and other possible natural hazards in Mexico and its impact on the surrounding rural communities and urban settlements” and will be presented by Dr Carlos Valdés Gonzales, General Director CENAPRED, National Centre for Disaster Prevention in Mexico.

In the seminar, Dr Valdés will explain how different natural hazards are monitored on daily basis in order to ensure the safety of the populations at risk in México. When disaster strikes, effective and early warnings are paramount. How can Mexico hold an excellent record for ensuring its population safety since the mayor earthquake in 1986? All welcome! Wine and refreshments will be served.

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