Tag Archives: TNS

Next TNS seminar: ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’

TNS

Professor Ben Rampton from King’s College London will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar taking place on 21st June 2017 from 4-6pm in Lecture Theatre C, Avenue Campus. The seminar, entitled ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’, will begin with a 20-25 minute presentation which will be followed by an open discussion.

Professor Ben Rampton’s work involves ethnographic and interactional discourse analysis, cross-referring to work in anthropology, sociology, cultural and security studies. His publications focus on language in relation to urban multilingualism, youth, popular culture, ethnicities, class, (in)securitisation, education, second language learning, and research methodology.

For further details about this event, please visit the Modern Languages and Linguistics website.

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Next TNS seminar: “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 3rd May 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”. The seminar will be presented by Ulrike Hanna Meinhof. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

My paper is based on my current experiences with an AHRC Follow-on-project: Madagascar in the world: the impact of music on global concerns. The project proposed to put the results of my previously AHRC-funded project TNMundi (2006-2010) into the popular and widely accessible form of a full-length music documentary, directed by Cesar Paes, an award-winning film director of the Parisian independent film company Laterit.

The film was completed in the autumn of 2016 and has so far been screened at various international film festivals and special screenings in the UK, Italy, and on La Reunion.

Each screening was accompanied by a questionnaire in the respective languages gauging audience reactions. Apart from wanting feed-back about the kind of audience the film attracted at each of these diverse sites in terms of age, gender, and origin and on how they responded to the artistic and musical quality of the film, there were some closed and some open questions on the themes and social concerns raised by the film and by the musicians in its centre.

My own previous narrative interviews and transnational field work with these Malagasy musicians had highlighted their transnational mobility, their attempt to challenge ethnic divisions by their music and to engage people worldwide in environmental and social causes. In my paper I will give a few examples of these and subsequently show a few key extracts of the film where the director in my view tried to raise these issues by the very indirect and subtle means of the film.

A brief assessment of some of the results of the questionnaires will lead to a discussion about some of the issues raised by replacing or complementing an academic top-down analysis in favour of a much more intuitive artistic format.

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Next TNS seminar: “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”. The seminar will be presented by Jenny Cuffe and Henrietta Nleya. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

‘I believe that there is no more real or more realistic way of exploring communication in general than by focussing on the simultaneously practical and theoretical problems that emerge from the particular interaction between the investigator and the person being questioned.’ P. Bourdieu ‘The Weight of the World: Social Suffering in Contemporary Society’ (1999, p.607)

The sociologist Pierre Bourdieu reminds us that, although the research relationship is different from other exchanges in everyday life because its objective is pure knowledge, it remains nevertheless a social relationship.

I have invited Henrietta Nleya, a key participant in my doctoral research on the impact of Zimbabwe’s migrant families, to have a conversation with me about our ‘particular interaction’ and the relationship we built.

The nature of transnational family research means that I relied on Henrietta not only to tell me her own life story, but also to introduce me to relatives living in Zimbabwe and South Africa. This presented us both with practical and ethical challenges for, although together in Southampton we had time to establish a shared history and ties of trust, I arrived at the homes of her parents and siblings as a prying stranger. And although I guaranteed anonymity in my thesis, I was conscious that family members would have no difficulty recognising each other – with the potential for hurt feelings and even resentment.

This conversation will be the start of an open discussion on relationship-building in the research process, in which you are invited to present questions and problems that have arisen in your own research.

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Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.

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Next TNS seminar: “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd February 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “The Language of Others: Writing Berlin Lives”. The seminar will be presented by Professor Patrick Stevenson from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. All welcome! Read more…

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Next TNS seminar of the ‘Moving Stories’ series

TNS

The next seminar of the 2016-17 ‘Moving Stories’ Centre for Transational Studies (TNS) seminar series will take place on Wednesday 14th December 2016 from 5:00-6:30pm, and will be presented jointly by Dr Eleanor Jones and Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at the University of Southampton. Eleanor’s presentation is entitled “Death stories: encountering the corpse in narratives of Lusophone Africa”, and Scott will be presenting on “(Re)moving stories: closure and commemoration at the Gurs internment camp”.

The TNS ‘moving stories’ series involves stories that move literally across borders and contexts, as well as stories which move us emotionally. As students of societies, histories and cultures we often engage stories in order to understand and analyse our subject. Stories come in different forms: biographies and life narratives; oral histories; personal and collective memories; material-object stories; poems; novels; legends; myths; visual narratives; music; art; news and media stories; non-fictional sources.

All welcome! Watch this space for details of future TNS seminars.

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Next TNS event: ‘Cross-Faculty Debate on Migration Research’

TNS

The Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) and the interdisciplinary Migration@Soton Research Network are organising a joint meeting to discuss the current state of the art in migration research, and to develop new plans for joint initiatives in research projects and joint publications.

This event will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 27th April 2016 in Room 1177, Building 65, Avenue Campus, and is entitled ‘Cross-Faculty Debate on Migration Research’. The informal group discussion will begin with brief three-minute introductions to participants’ respective research agendas, leading to an open debate. Anyone interested in migration research in the Humanities or the Social Sciences is welcome to attend.

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POSTPONED to 4th May: TNS Seminar: “‘A place of utter desolation and abandonment…’: Administrative noise, neglect and the commemoration of the camp de Gurs.”

*** Please note: The seminer was originally scheduled for Wednesday 10th February but has now been postponed until Wednesday 4th May ***

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 10th February 2016 in Room 1177, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The session is entitled “‘A place of utter desolation and abandonment…’: Administrative noise, neglect and the commemoration of the camp de Gurs” and will be led by Dr Scott Soo from Modern Languages at Southampton. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:
The camp de Gurs was an internment centre that was initially built in 1939 for refugees from the Spanish Civil War. It continued to be used throughout WWII and became implicated in the Final Solution when German Jewish internees were deported to Auschwitz. While much is known about the internees’ experiences of Gurs and the operation of the camp, we know very little about what happened at the site once the camp was closed down. This paper sets out to explain how the camp was dismantled and then transformed into a place of commemorative activity through a focus on the camp cemetery. The analysis of local and national state archives will point towards a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics surrounding the construction and development of remembrance narratives in post-war France that necessarily accounts for both international factors and transnational processes.

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Joint TNS and Archaeology seminar: ‘Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage’

TNS

A joint Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) and Archaeology seminar will be taking place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 9th December 2015, in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage’ and will be presented by Dr Rodney Harrison, Reader in Archaeology, Heritage and Museum Studies at University College London and Director of the Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage research programme. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

How does heritage make the future? From nuclear waste in Sweden to global endangered languages, from a frozen genetic ‘Ark’ in Nottingham to the global seed vault in Arctic Norway, and from ‘rewilded’ landscapes in Portugal to paper-based archives in Paris, Assembling Alternative Futures for Heritage (AAFH) aims to develop a broad, international and cross-sectoral comparative framework for understanding ‘heritage’ not as a domain which is concerned with the past, but rather as a series of heterogeneous yet distinctive practices oriented towards assembling (alternative) futures. This paper introduces this collaborative research project, which involves a team of 10 researchers, 3 PhD students and 21 international partner organisations, and aims to show how its broad themes relate to some of the most pressing ecological, social and political issues of our time.

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Next TNS Seminar: ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences?’

Impact

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place from 5:00-6:30pm on Wednesday 25th November 2015 in Room 1173, Building 65, Avenue Campus. The session is entitled ‘The Impact of Research: What do we understand by it and what counts as evidence in the Humanities and the Social Sciences’. The discussion of this topic will be introduced by short presentations of three authors of impact studies in the last REF: Professor Wrigley from Geography, Professor Jon Adams from Archaeology and Professor Ulrike Meinhof from Modern Languages. All welcome!

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