Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?

TNSThe next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar will be held on Wednesday 21st November from 3-4pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations?’ All staff and students are welcome!

The seminar is entitled Historiographies of the Present: What is to be Decolonised about Non-Aligned Futures and Imaginations? Here is the abstract for the seminar:
Contemporary Eastern Europe is currently, once more, one of the spaces for the rise of far right, fascist agendas, as much as increasingly dominated by the rule of heteronormatively imagined futures. To an extent, the “region” holds a shared socialist history of gender inequality and in places like Romania, long histories of slavery and domination over Roma populations. In this contemporaneity that hardly feels shared, where does a decolonial project need to start from? What kind of “whiteness” are we talking about when talking about Eastern European, former socialist subjects? Why are intersectional issues of race, gender and sexuality historically enmeshed but also often invisible from critical contemporary evaluations of the aesthetics and politics of the “region”? I propose to turn to a specific historicalcontextual moment of the Non-Aligned Movement as a point of departure in this analysis to ask what type of imagination and what forms of futurity were projected from socialist Eastern Europe onto some of the late colonial, soon to be independent countries in Africa.

The seminar will be led by Dr Mihaela Brebenel, Lecturer in Digital Media Culture at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Mihaela is interested in screen studies, film theory, media archaeology, aesthetic theory, the politics of the audiovisual, feminist practices with moving images, the cultural production of subjectivity in contemporary technologically-mediated contexts, historiographies and critical uses of archival images in academic and artistic practice. She also reflects in her work on gender, performance and interventions exploring the private and public configurations of media, space, memory, and the possibilities of collective work.

We have arranged for the event to finish on time for colleagues who wish to attend the Advanced Research in Arts and Humanities seminar at 4pm, and the event is held in the same building.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

Next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar: A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity

TNSThe Centre for Transnational Studies, in collaboration with the Centre for Imperial and Postcolonial Studies, is hosting its first event of the academic year on Wednesday 31st October from 3-4:30pm in room 1173 at Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘A transnational feminist perspective: Recognising difference, building solidarity’. All staff and students are welcome!

The event is a postgraduate and early career masterclass run by Dr Maria Tomlinson, a postdoctoral research associate on the project ‘FemmepowermentNiger’ based in the Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield. The idea with these masterclasses is for students (PGT and PGR) and interested staff to get an introduction to potential new ways of approaching their work, and for students to have a chance to talk to someone a few years further on in the postgrad and academic career journey. Dr Tomlinson was one of the first cohort of AHRC SWW DTP students, and completed her PhD in French between the Universities of Bristol and Reading earlier this year. She also set up one of the first SWW DTP research clusters on gender and sexuality.

Further details, including an abstract, can be found on the poster for the event.

Next TNS seminar: Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)

TNSAnne O’Connor from NUI Galway will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 16th May 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Religion: Textual Trails (Or how to domesticate the transnational)’. All staff and students are welcome!

Here is the abstract for the seminar:
This talk will look at the transnationality of religion and how the spread of religion is supported by the printed word. It will use the example of global Catholicism and devotional reading to question how orthodoxies emanating from the Vatican reach the lives of Catholics in the Anglophone world. It will look at the intersection of translation, book history and religion to examine how each can work together and provide momentum for transnational influence. By focusing on the materiality of the transmitted words, the talk will discuss how popular printing allowed for the transnational to enter the domestic sphere.

Next TNS seminar in conjunction with the Department of Film: ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’

TNSDeborah Shaw from the University of Portsmouth will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar, taking place on Wednesday 21st February 2018 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus (Building 65). The seminar is entitled ‘Transnational Cinema: Milestones in a New(ish) Field of Study’ and will be delivered in conjunction with the Department of Film. All staff and students are welcome! Here is the abstract:

This paper aims to present an overview of some key developments in ways of conceptualising the transnational in film studies. It considers the reasons for the late adoption of the transnational in film studies in relation to the social sciences. 2005 sees the beginning of a transnational momentum in our discipline with the following years seeing a number of conceptual and theoretical essays and edited volumes and the founding of a journal, Transnational Cinemas in 2010. The paper outlines the key areas of focus in what I am identifying as the first phase of transnational cinema studies and considers question of scales of value that have been applied to the transnational. Following this, the paper discusses approaches to transnational film theory through an analysis of a selection of definitional essays. The final section of the paper presents an overview of what I am characterising as the second phase of transnational film studies, and considers the expanded reach of the transnational to the many areas that make up the discipline.

Next TNS seminar: ‘German and its Worlds: Situating the National and the Transnational in Teaching and Research’

TNS

Benedict Schofield from King’s College London will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar taking place on Wednesday 13th December 2017 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘German and its Worlds: Situating the National and the Transnational in Teaching and Research’. All staff and students are welcome! Here is the abstract:

Where does German Studies as a discipline sit in relation to the transnational, and what role can the transnational play in helping us do German Studies differently? This talk considers the ways in which the transnational can function as a positive force for generating new ideas, both in teaching and research, for the wide interdisciplinary field that is German Studies. It will look at recent transnational projects, such as Transnational German Studies (directed at undergraduates) and German in the World (directed at researchers), alongside case studies from my own research on Anglo-German relations, which pose questions about the many different meanings we project on the term ‘transnational’. Is the transnational more than a descriptive term, identifying particular forms or moments of cultural motion, transfer and translation? If so, how can it also function as a key mode of enquiry – a form of Modern Languages methodology – that underpins our work as scholars and teachers of German Studies? And how might this in turn help us express more clearly the value and impact of our discipline at a time of perceived crisis?

Next TNS seminar: ‘On Cultural Transnationalisms: The case of World(-)literatures in Portuguese’

TNS

Dr Emanuelle Santos from the University of Birmingham will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar taking place on Wednesday 22nd November 2017 from 5-6:30pm in Room 1177, Avenue Campus. The seminar is entitled ‘On Cultural Transnationalisms: The case of World(-)literatures in Portuguese’. Here is the abstract:

The resurface and resignification of the concept of World Literature in the beginning of the current century has certainly infused some new blood to the field of Comparative Literature. As the strong colours of the postcolonial critical paradigm lose appeal and prestige among funding agencies and academics, the paradigm of World Literature/World-Literature rises with its comforting image of a literature of the world as one, albeit uneven. As such, World(-)literature dislocates Comparative Literature’s focus from coloniality and hegemony, drawing attention to circulation and border-crossing, enabling potentially problematic frames of comparison. Drawing from the case study of the circulation of the literatures of Portuguese-speaking Africa within and beyond the Portuguese-speaking world, this paper aims at questioning the potential of World(-)Literature as a productive critical paradigm from which to reconsider the world as one.

Next TNS seminar: ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’

TNS

Professor Ben Rampton from King’s College London will be speaking at the next Centre for Transnational Studies seminar taking place on 21st June 2017 from 4-6pm in Lecture Theatre C, Avenue Campus. The seminar, entitled ‘Linguistics, Ethnography and Identities’, will begin with a 20-25 minute presentation which will be followed by an open discussion.

Professor Ben Rampton’s work involves ethnographic and interactional discourse analysis, cross-referring to work in anthropology, sociology, cultural and security studies. His publications focus on language in relation to urban multilingualism, youth, popular culture, ethnicities, class, (in)securitisation, education, second language learning, and research methodology.

For further details about this event, please visit the Modern Languages and Linguistics website.

Next TNS seminar: “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 3rd May 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “A researcher’s tale: Revisiting research through the eyes of a camera and a diverse public”. The seminar will be presented by Ulrike Hanna Meinhof. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

My paper is based on my current experiences with an AHRC Follow-on-project: Madagascar in the world: the impact of music on global concerns. The project proposed to put the results of my previously AHRC-funded project TNMundi (2006-2010) into the popular and widely accessible form of a full-length music documentary, directed by Cesar Paes, an award-winning film director of the Parisian independent film company Laterit.

The film was completed in the autumn of 2016 and has so far been screened at various international film festivals and special screenings in the UK, Italy, and on La Reunion.

Each screening was accompanied by a questionnaire in the respective languages gauging audience reactions. Apart from wanting feed-back about the kind of audience the film attracted at each of these diverse sites in terms of age, gender, and origin and on how they responded to the artistic and musical quality of the film, there were some closed and some open questions on the themes and social concerns raised by the film and by the musicians in its centre.

My own previous narrative interviews and transnational field work with these Malagasy musicians had highlighted their transnational mobility, their attempt to challenge ethnic divisions by their music and to engage people worldwide in environmental and social causes. In my paper I will give a few examples of these and subsequently show a few key extracts of the film where the director in my view tried to raise these issues by the very indirect and subtle means of the film.

A brief assessment of some of the results of the questionnaires will lead to a discussion about some of the issues raised by replacing or complementing an academic top-down analysis in favour of a much more intuitive artistic format.

Next TNS seminar: “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar will take place on Wednesday 22nd March 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm, in Building 65, Room 1177, and is entitled “Family stories: the relationship between narrator and listener”. The seminar will be presented by Jenny Cuffe and Henrietta Nleya. All welcome!

Here is the abstract for this seminar:

‘I believe that there is no more real or more realistic way of exploring communication in general than by focussing on the simultaneously practical and theoretical problems that emerge from the particular interaction between the investigator and the person being questioned.’ P. Bourdieu ‘The Weight of the World: Social Suffering in Contemporary Society’ (1999, p.607)

The sociologist Pierre Bourdieu reminds us that, although the research relationship is different from other exchanges in everyday life because its objective is pure knowledge, it remains nevertheless a social relationship.

I have invited Henrietta Nleya, a key participant in my doctoral research on the impact of Zimbabwe’s migrant families, to have a conversation with me about our ‘particular interaction’ and the relationship we built.

The nature of transnational family research means that I relied on Henrietta not only to tell me her own life story, but also to introduce me to relatives living in Zimbabwe and South Africa. This presented us both with practical and ethical challenges for, although together in Southampton we had time to establish a shared history and ties of trust, I arrived at the homes of her parents and siblings as a prying stranger. And although I guaranteed anonymity in my thesis, I was conscious that family members would have no difficulty recognising each other – with the potential for hurt feelings and even resentment.

This conversation will be the start of an open discussion on relationship-building in the research process, in which you are invited to present questions and problems that have arisen in your own research.

Next TNS seminar: ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’

TNS

The next Centre for Transnational Studies (TNS) seminar (co-hosted by the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies (CIPCS)) will take place on Tuesday 14th March 2017 at 5pm, in Room 1163, Building 65, Avenue Campus. At the seminar, Dr Bryan Gibson from John Hopkins University will discuss his new book ‘Sold Out? US Foreign Policy, Iraq, the Kurds, and the Cold War’. All welcome!

For further information, please see the event page on the University of Southampton Humanities website.